Gypsy

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Related to Gypsie: Gypsy Rose Lee

Gypsy

, Gipsy
1. 
a. a member of a people scattered throughout Europe and North America, who maintain a nomadic way of life in industrialized societies. They migrated from NW India from about the 9th century onwards
b. (as modifier): a Gypsy fortune-teller
2. the language of the Gypsies; Romany

What does it mean when you dream about a gypsy?

Dreaming about gypsies may indicate the desire to roam freely without responsibilities and obligations, or to venture forth to seek one’s fortune by chance.

gypsy

[′jip·sē]
(naval architecture)
A small auxiliary drum fitted to one or both ends of a winch or windlass.

Gypsy

member of nomadic people who usually travel in small caravans. [Eur. Hist.: NCE, 1168]

Gypsy

Specification and verification of concurrent systems software. Message passing using named mailboxes. Separately compilable units: routine (procedure, function, or process), type and constant definition, each with a list of access rights.

["Report on the Language Gypsy", A.L. Ambler et al, UT Austin ICSCS-CMP-1976-08-1].
References in periodicals archive ?
222 articles on Romanian Gypsies were identified, of which 126 were in Curierul Zilei and 96 in Argesul Liber.
As shown, theft and violence are the main topics in the news articles, maintaining the stereotype that Romanian Gypsies are the "black sheep" of society.
It really seems that the specific problems of the Romanian gypsies pass barely noticed by local media, poverty and unemployment being problems that do not belong to this population.
Another parameter used in the analysis is the nature of the event, resulting in conflictual events involving one or more players who are Romanian gypsies and events of non-conflictual situations connected to the people who participated in the event reported.
As for the report conflictual-non-confrontation events, the balance is in favor of the latter, it highlights the balance of journalistic reports on actions involving Romanian gypsies.
In their coverage of positive actions, the press gave 20% less attention to them concentrating particularly on sporting events ("Romanian gypsies go the Falcons Costesti world"), issues relating to the increased access to education (Romanian gypsies language teachers), Romanian gypsies' desire to work in society ("He wants to work in community service") and improving their relationship with local authorities ("A new collaborative project: The gendarmes will dance with the Gypsies").
In terms of journalistic commentary, three categories have been identified: positive style--the article has a favorable attitude towards the gypsy, neutral style--articles containing positive information, and negative style the article is hostile towards the Romanian gypsies.
8% less aggressive, but the irony of certain actions against Romanian gypsies is more common.
As the pictures complete the mental image of gypsies, by attaching them to a text, a certain approach is reinforced.
Thus, the press cannot be accused of any type of discriminatory attitudes against Romanian gypsies because the choice of terms can be argued as a way to avoid repetition of word.