Gypsy Rose Lee


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Related to Gypsy Rose Lee: Natalie Wood
Gypsy Rose Lee
Ellen June Hovick
Birthday
BirthplaceSeattle, Washington, U.S.
Died
Occupation
Actress, author, playwright, dancer, entertainer

Lee, Gypsy Rose (b. Louise Rose Hovick)

(1914–70) stripper, actress, writer; born in Seattle, Wash. Starting as a 4-year-old in vaudeville with sister June Havoc, she became the best-known stripper of the 1930s. She made some films (first as Louise Hovick) and wrote two mystery stories as well as an autobiography that was the basis of the musical, Gypsy. Stylish and witty, she was briefly a talk-show host (1966).

Lee, Gypsy Rose

(1914–1970) American burlesque artiste. [Am. Hist.: Halliwell, 429]
See: Nudity
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References in periodicals archive ?
McIcIntyre wrote a revealing description of Gypsy Rose Lee in the Journal- American.
CHICAGO: In the Depression-era days of Gypsy Rose Lee, burlesque dancing was about as naughty, and as nude, as it got in public.
And so the name Gypsy Rose Lee slowly became synonymous with what has been called her special sexual gimmick, namely the, "eroticism of the undelivered promise", in other words illusion is better than a flash of the real thing.
While Gypsy Rose Lee would probably have been tickled by the homage, the reference demonstrates how much we've needed a biography of the patron saint of striptease.
He said: 'I'm delighted that the hugely talented Helena is performing the role of Gypsy Rose Lee.
And, yes, Gypsy Rose Lee, who added a great deal of vivacity to the house and learned about literature from its residents, was a close friend of George Davis.
She treated a production of Mike Todd's Star and Garter showcasing Gypsy Rose Lee with the same care and attention as Turandot for the Metropolitan Opera.
Based on the autobiography of world-famous stripper Gypsy Rose Lee, the show centers on her relationship with her mother, Rose, who drove her to fame and then drove her away.
In the bump 'n' grind era of Gypsy Rose Lee and Tempest Storm, burlesque wasn't considered folk art but a ``poor man's follies.
When Gypsy Rose Lee started her career in what used to be called exotic dancing, her fellow dancers -- at least in the movie version -- told her she had to have a gimmick.
He already owns number 153-155 next door which was previously owned by Gypsy Rose Lee - and unusual 32-foot wide by 95-foot deep home with center courtyard.
Tyne Daly (known to followers of television's Cagney and Lacey) is such a star, and she is ably partnered by Jonathan Hadary as Herbie, the boyfried in fealty to Rose's charisma, and Crista Moore as Louise, a latter-day Cinderella whose apotheosis isn't a match with Prince Charming but to p biling as a stripper, none other than Gypsy Rose Lee.