Gyrator


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gyrator

[′jī‚rād·ər]
(electromagnetism)
A waveguide component that uses a ferrite section to give zero phase shift for one direction of propagation and 180° phase shift for the other direction; in other words, it causes a reversal of signal polarity for one direction of propagation but not for the other direction. Also known as microwave gyrator.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gyrator

 

a directional phase shifter, a microwave device. This device creates a half-wave phase change of electromagnetic waves propagating in opposite directions. Gyrators are used as a component in various microwave devices, such as gates, modulators, circulators, and switches. The operating principle of gyrators is based on the irreversible properties of magnetized ferrite; these properties cause rotations of polarization plane, phase shift, and so on. The simplest kind of gyrator consists of a circular radio waveguide that contains an appropriately dimensioned, magnetized ferrite rod (magnetized in a magnetic field of a previously determined intensity). A circular waveguide is coupled to a rectangular waveguide by matching transitions.

REFERENCES

Gurevich, A. G. Ferrity na sverkhvysokikh chastotakh. Moscow, 1960.
Lax, B., and K. Batton. Sverkhvysokochastotnye ferrity i ferrimagnetiki. Moscow, 1965. (Translated from English.)

B. E. LEVIN

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
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In order to construct devices such as circulators [1-6,9,11], gyrators [7] or isolators [8,10] the FCL section has to be cascaded with reciprocal section providing input signals to the FCL which are either in phase or out of phase.
A special case of the quadripole is the gyrator, defined as an anti-reciprocal passive linear quadripole:
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