herb


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herb

(ûrb, hûrb), name for any plant that is used medicinally or as a spice and for the useful product of such a plant. Herbs as condiments and seasonings are still important in culinary art; the use of medicinal herbs, however, has waned since the advent of prescription and synthetic medicines, although plants remain a major source of drugs. The term herb is also applied to all herbaceous plants as distinguished from woody plants.

Bibliography

See R. E. Clarkson, Herbs, their Culture and Uses (1966); G. B. Foster, Herbs for Every Garden (rev. ed. 1973); A. and C. Krochmal, A Guide to the Medicinal Plants of the United States (1974).

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herb

[hərb]
(botany)
A seed plant that lacks a persistent, woody stem aboveground and dies at the end of the season.
An aromatic plant or plant part used medicinally or for food flavoring.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

herb

1. a seed-bearing plant whose aerial parts do not persist above ground at the end of the growing season; herbaceous plant
2. 
a. any of various usually aromatic plants, such as parsley, rue, and rosemary, that are used in cookery and medicine
b. (as modifier): a herb garden
3. Caribbean a slang term for marijuana
www.culinarycafe.com/Spices_Herbs
www.herbs.org
www.herbsforafrica.co.za
www.theherbcottage.com/herbs.html
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
What began as a hobby and a way to grow herbs for use in programs at the museums she managed, soon became a personal passion which was turned into a full-time endeavor.
Its piney fragrance is a lovely addition to a container herb garden.
Herbs can be used as seeds, flowers, or leaves; cooked and eaten themselves or used to infuse a dish or drink.
Sue said: "The society have also provided funding to purchase plants for a new herb bed at Ellisland - though trying to keep the rabbits out of it is proving to be quite difficult."
"We cleared the land by hand using a grubbing hoe and a bush axe," Blount recalls, "and built in-ground beds for an herb garden." Her herbs took off, and by the early 1990s, Blount was running a successful fresh-cut herb business, providing herbs to Morton's Gourmet Market, and creating an in-ground herb garden for Chef Paul Mattison's now-shuttered Siesta Key restaurant.
A SUNNY SPOT As many herbs enjoy hot, dry conditions and well-drained fertile soil, your herb garden is best off in a sunny southfacing position, with added protection from north and east winds.
"Since early days, we have been considered pioneers in sourcing herbs as hakeems and vaids would prefer to buy from us.
Like Lacuesta, Raymond Aquino Macapagal wrote about only one herb-pinespes which starts off as plain grass, masticated by cows and 'through the wonders of a ruminant's four-chambered stomach, transformed into a piquant herb appreciated by the hardiest of palates.'
What to do with all these herbs? One approach to preserving herbs is to freeze them as cubes.