Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Determination of ritonavir, a new HIV protease inhibitor, in biological samples using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography.
In addition, the HIV protease inhibitors also act as inhibitors of CYP3A4 to varying degrees (ritonavir > indinavir > nelfinavir > saquinavir in terms of inhibitory potency) (8, 9).
No booklet can answer all of your questions, or take the place of a doctor in helping you make the important decisions you are facing, but this information will help you understand the basics about HIV protease inhibitors.
It is used in combination with other medications to control HIV infection and is included in the ARV class of drugs known as HIV protease inhibitors.
Other factors such as use of HIV meds, use of HIV protease inhibitors, T cell count, viral load, and duration of HIV infection did not increase the risk of having HAD.
But the mechanism of the drug interaction is well known (inhibition of the enzyme dangerously increases the erythromycin level, which can affect the heart rhythm) and it is clear that HIV protease inhibitors would also be a risk if used at the same time as the erythromycin.
Human Immunodeficiency Virus HIV Protease Inhibitors HIV Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors HIV Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors HIV Entry Inhibitors HIV Integrase Inhibitors Hepatitis C Virus Protease Inhibitors HCV Polymerase Nucleoside Inhibitors Other HCV Inhibitors Respiratory Syncytial Virus Inhibitors Influenza, Hepatitis B, and Cytomegalovirus Inhibitors
A study of 182 patients at a major hospital in France suggests that HIV protease inhibitors may help to reduce liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with both HIV and hepatitis C.
As with other HIV protease inhibitors, patients taking both Kaletra and drugs to treat erectile dysfunction (for example, Viagra, Cialis, and Levitra) can experience potentially dangerous side effects.
First generation FDA Approved HIV protease inhibitors
Second-Generation Approved HIV Protease Inhibitors for Treatment of HIV/AIDS