Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The HIV protease inhibitors continue to play a very important role in HAART.
How HIV protease inhibitors promote atherosclerotic lesion formation.
By adding this or that chemical group to specific locations on a carbon-60 scaffolding, Friedman has designed HIV protease inhibitors that bind to the protease's active site 50 times as readily as the molecules he considered in the early 1990s did.
For example, this work went to press shortly before HIV protease inhibitors, integrase inhibitors, and non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors burst onto the scene; these are perhaps only the most obvious examples of terms that must be added for the vocabulary to remain current and useful.
No booklet can answer all of your questions, or take the place of a doctor in helping you make the important decisions you are facing, but this information will help you understand the basics about HIV protease inhibitors.
Symposium proceedings: HIV protease inhibitors: When and how they should be used.
It is used in combination with other medications to control HIV infection and is included in the ARV class of drugs known as HIV protease inhibitors.
Other factors such as use of HIV meds, use of HIV protease inhibitors, T cell count, viral load, and duration of HIV infection did not increase the risk of having HAD.
But the mechanism of the drug interaction is well known (inhibition of the enzyme dangerously increases the erythromycin level, which can affect the heart rhythm) and it is clear that HIV protease inhibitors would also be a risk if used at the same time as the erythromycin.
A study of 182 patients at a major hospital in France suggests that HIV protease inhibitors may help to reduce liver fibrosis and cirrhosis in patients with both HIV and hepatitis C.