R

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Related to HIV-1 gene: env gene, pol gene

R,

18th letter of the alphabetalphabet
[Gr. alpha-beta, like Eng. ABC], system of writing, theoretically having a one-for-one relation between character (or letter) and phoneme (see phonetics). Few alphabets have achieved the ideal exactness.
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, corresponding to Greek rho. When in Latin alphabets the letters for p and r became similar in appearance, the rho form (P; which at first was used for the r sound) was restricted to the p sound, and an extra line was added for the r sound (R). In Greek, where no confusion developed, the rho continued to look like Latin P. A modification of R is the symbol ℞, used medically for recipe [Lat.,=take] and liturgically for responsum [Lat.,=response].

r

(nucleonics)

R

(nucleonics)

R

1. Abbr. for “radius.”
2. Abbr. for “right.”
3. Symbol for the capacity of a pile (for example, 3R indicates three times design capacity).
4. Symbol for the thermal resistance of a material or component of construction.
5. Symbol for electrical resistance.

sound reduction index, R

British term for sound transmission loss.

R

A programming language for statistical computing and graphics that is released under the GNU license. R was designed to handle a wide variety of complex statistical tasks, and many user-developed routines are also available. R is the open source version of S, which was developed in the mid-1970s by John Chambers at Bell Labs (S-PLUS is a commercial version from TIBCO Software). For more information, visit www.r-project.org.
References in periodicals archive ?
The recently published paper (accessible by clicking here) appears in the January 14, 2011 PLoS One Journal, an international, peer-reviewed publication produced by the Public Library of Science, and presents an analysis of HIV-1 gene sequences from heavily treatment-experienced HIV-infected volunteers treated with KP-1461 for a 4-month period.
Takara Bio has been developing a novel retroviral technology for HIV-1 gene therapy, in which MazF, an endoribonuclease from Escherichia coli, confers resistance to a broad-spectrum of HIV-1 strains on CD4+ T cells.
The delivery of the HIV-1 gene into the cells stimulates the body to generate a potent cellular immune response to HIV-1, producing an army of killer cells (called T-cells) that are programmed to recognize and kill HIV-1 infected cells.