Haber-Bosch process


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Haber-Bosch process

[¦hä·bər ¦bȯsh ‚prä·səs]
(chemical engineering)
Early nitrogen-fixation process for production of ammonia from hydrogen and nitrogen, catalyzed by iron; now replaced by more efficient ammonia synthesis processes. Also known as Haber process.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Haber-Bosch process for synthesizing ammonia on an industrial scale represents as significant an innovation as any in the 20th century.
In short, a century after the introduction of the Haber-Bosch process allowed industrial society to bypass bacterial constraints on the production of fixed nitrogen, a system for producing knowledge about how to set human-defined limits that are both ecologically justified and socially just is gradually emerging.
Only with the development of the Haber-Bosch process did concerns associated with limited supplies of nitrogen come to an end.
100 years ago, the development of the Haber-Bosch process for synthesizing ammonia pushed industrial society into new ecological territory.
The development of the Haber-Bosch process for synthesizing ammonia surely ranks as one of the most significant technological innovations in the history of industrialization (Erisman et al.
Although there have been many new photocatalysts and approaches to solve the problems of the Haber-Bosch process, till now, no viable and efficient catalysts could match all requirements of an active, selective, scalable, long-lived catalyst for the sustainable photocatalytic reduction of [N.sub.2] to N[H.sub.3] [11].
As we know, iron plays an important role in the Haber-Bosch process, but it is ferric oxide ([Fe.sub.2][O.sub.3]) not iron as the alternative to titanium that could photocatalytic the reduction of [N.sub.2] to N[H.sub.3].
Although the Haber-Bosch process is an important chemical industrial approach to the worldwide population, this traditional N[H.sub.3] production process is a high energy-consumption and environmental pollution process.
Energy coming from sustainable source as solar, an alternative, sustainable N[H.sub.3] synthesis process based on the biological [N.sub.2] fixation would be more energy efficient than the Haber-Bosch process [7].
Imitating nature, humans use the all-important Haber-Bosch process to break down nitrogen into ammonia, which can then be further processed to produce fertilizers and to make nitrogen available for the production of pigments, fuels, materials, pharmaceuticals and beyond.