Habima Theater

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Habima Theater

(häbē`mä), [Heb.,=the stage], the national theater of Israel. Founded in 1917 in Moscow by Nahum Zemach and at first affiliated with the Moscow Art Theatre, it was one of the first Hebrew-language theaters. In 1926 the company left the Soviet Union and toured extensively for several years before settling in Palestine in 1931, and it was designated the national theater in 1958. Among its best-known productions are The Dybbuk, The Golem, and Oedipus Rex.

Bibliography

See E. Levy, The Habima, Israel's National Theatre, 1917–1977 (1979).

Habima Theater

national theater of Israel; its troupe is famous for passionate acting style. [Israeli Hist.: NCE, 1170]
See: Theater
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Culture Square is home to the Israel National Habima Theatre and the Israel Philharmonic.
Focused through the lens of Canadian Jewish experience, the anthology offers its own maps of Yiddishland, as in Chayele Grober's "To the Great Wide World," which describes her travels with the Habima theatre troupe.
The final section describes the transmutation of Hebrew drama and theatre into a secular and liberal enterprise, including the function of mythical mappings in secular drama, the theatrical need for the actualization of foreign canonic drama, and examples of productions that illustrate the Jewish nature of Israeli drama: the Itim Theatre versions of the biblical narrative on the daughter of Jephtah and Georg Buchner's Woyzeck, the Habima Theatre productions of Jean-Paul Sartre's Les Troyennes and Nissim Aloni's The American Princess, and the Cameri Theatre production of Hanoch Levin's Sufferings of Job.
They covered the unfurling of banners and a Palestinian flag at a performance in the Globe Theatre by Israel's Habima theatre company the previous evening.
Among the companies invited to perform at the Globe is Israel's Habima Theatre, whose production of The Merchant Of Venice will take to the famous stage this May.
Apologists for the Habima Theatre implausibly insist that its activities have no bearing on Israeli propaganda.
There is a growing campaign to urge the London Shakespeare's Globe Theatre to cancel Israel's Habima Theatre's performances of 'The Merchant of Venice' on 28-29th May 2012 at the Shakespeare Globe to Globe Festival.
Most of them also contend with disabilities such as Down syndrome and austism--and according to director Dina Shadwell, one of the professional theatre artists ushering the musical to fruition, "Every rehearsal is a success story." Since 2003, Shadwell has run Jerry's Habima Theatre under the auspices of the MJCCA's Blonder Family Department for Developmental Disabilities, endowed by Lois and Jerry Blonder.
PNN A protest was held by the Boycott Israel Network, disrupting Israel's Habima Theatre's performance of Shakespeare's The Merchant of Venice at The Globe Theatre, London.
The duo of plays, Bat-Yaml Tykocin, is the work of directors Michal Zadara from Poland's Wspolczesny Theatre and Yael Ronen from Israel's Habima Theatre. Ronen directed Polish actors, in the Polish language, in a play about the journey of three generations of a family from Israel to Poland; Zadara examined the image of Jews in contemporary Polish culture, using Israeli actors and Hebrew text.
PNN A group of actors, writers and directors last week signed a letter asking the world famous Globe Theatre in London to boycott the Israeli Habima Theatre. As part of the six week Globe to Globe festival, where ShakespeareA[sup.3]s entire works of 37 plays will be performed in 37 different languages from theatre companies around the world, Habima Theatre was booked to produce William ShakespeareA[sup.3]s The Merchant of Venice, and to perform the entire play in Hebrew.
At Teatr Zydowski (the Yiddish Theatre), one of the few full-fledged Yiddish-language theatres left in the world, 500 well-dressed, mostly non-Jewish Polish theatregoers take their seats, don earphones for simultaneous translation and sit in rapt attention for a performance of Herb Gardner's I'm Not Rappaport, brought to Warsaw by the Yiddish Theatre of Israel, recently formed by Shmuel Atzmon, formerly of that nation's Habima Theatre.