Habitat

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habitat

the environment in which an animal or plant normally lives or grows

Habitat

The sum of the environmental conditions that determine the existence of a community in a specific place where humans, animals, plants, and microorganisms live and its surroundings, both living and nonliving.

Habitat

 

an area of land or water occupied by an organism, a group of a single species, a biocenosis, or a synousia and possessing all conditions required for its existence (climate, topography, soil, food).

The habitat of a species is defined as the total area within the species’ range of distribution that satisfies the species’ ecological requirements. The habitat of a population is the part of the species’ habitat that will guarantee the existence of a population. The habitat of an individual is the actual area occupied by a given individual in all phases of its development. There are also animal habitats of family, herd, flock, or colony. There are plant habitats of groves, beds, and other communities. In terms of the use of a habitat, organisms are classified as stenotopic, occupying similar habitats only, and eurytopic, capable of occupying a variety of habitats within the given range of distribution.

The habitats of many species vary with the stage of development in the organism’s life cycle. For example, the larvae of amphibians usually live in water, and the adults on land. Many parasites have a dormant phase outside the given host and an active phase within the host (often limited even to certain organs). The various developmental phases of many parasitic plants are associated with different plant hosts. The part of the habitat that a species occupies for a limited time only (a season, a part of a day) or for a particular purpose (feeding, reproduction) is called a station. The habitat of a biocenosis is called a biotope.

REFERENCES

Naumov, N. P. Ekologiia zhivotnykh, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1963.
Osnovy lesnoi biogeotsenologii. Edited by V. N. Sukachev and N. V. Dylis. Moscow, 1964.

N. P. NAUMOV

habitat

[′hab·ə‚tat]
(ecology)
The part of the physical environment in which a plant or animal lives.

Habitat

(networking, graphics)
The original term for on-line graphical virtual communities or worlds. Created at Lucasfilm in 1985 by Randy Farmer and Chip Morningstar.

http://communities.com/habitat.html.
References in periodicals archive ?
The RF Habitat could be subdivided into habitats dominated by Trichilia emetica/Ficus sycomorus (at Shokwe Pan) and Vachellia xanthophloea/Cynodon dactylon (at Nyamithi and Banzi pans).
Students took a pretest addressing content knowledge of bird adaptations for habitat and descriptive vocabulary one week before instruction began, and the posttest a week after the five-weeklong unit of study concluded.
Three habitats (SAG, SAV, and NVSB) were seasonally sampled in replicate between December 2000 and October 2001 so as to evaluate the following habitat characteristics: macro-epibenthic fauna community structure, and the physical, chemical, and geological environmental conditions.
Threats from recreational activities may require special management considerations to preserve the area's favorable habitat conditions for the persistence of this population,'' a Fish and Wildlife report said of the Little Rock Creek area in the habitat proposal.
Schoolyard habitats and student achievement have also been linked, such as through the State Education and Environment Roundtable's 1999 report Closing the Achievement Gap.
Once a species is listed as endangered or threatened, Fish and Wildlife generally has up to a year to designate the critical habitat, agency spokeswoman Joan Jewett said.
According to Perry Donahoo, Southern Division president, "We are doubly honored to have the Reed quarry certified as a wildlife habitat and recognized as "Rookie of the Year" by WHC.
However, few doubt the negative effects that continued poaching will have on the butterfly's habitat in years to come.
These are the seeds of a major restoration project carried out by the city of Davis that ultimately will enhance wildlife habitat, provide a natural area for residents to visit and serve as an environmental education site for young and old alike.
When German immigrant Paul Kroegel began advocating for the protection of Florida's Pelican Island as critical habitat for a quickly dwindling population of brown pelicans more than a century ago, he had no idea that his efforts would lead to the creation of the world's leading wildlife preservation system.
The large blocks of forests that once offered nesting sites for birds now spell peril as they are overrun by cats, blue jays, and other predators attracted by the changing habitat.