Habitat

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habitat

the environment in which an animal or plant normally lives or grows

Habitat

The sum of the environmental conditions that determine the existence of a community in a specific place where humans, animals, plants, and microorganisms live and its surroundings, both living and nonliving.

Habitat

 

an area of land or water occupied by an organism, a group of a single species, a biocenosis, or a synousia and possessing all conditions required for its existence (climate, topography, soil, food).

The habitat of a species is defined as the total area within the species’ range of distribution that satisfies the species’ ecological requirements. The habitat of a population is the part of the species’ habitat that will guarantee the existence of a population. The habitat of an individual is the actual area occupied by a given individual in all phases of its development. There are also animal habitats of family, herd, flock, or colony. There are plant habitats of groves, beds, and other communities. In terms of the use of a habitat, organisms are classified as stenotopic, occupying similar habitats only, and eurytopic, capable of occupying a variety of habitats within the given range of distribution.

The habitats of many species vary with the stage of development in the organism’s life cycle. For example, the larvae of amphibians usually live in water, and the adults on land. Many parasites have a dormant phase outside the given host and an active phase within the host (often limited even to certain organs). The various developmental phases of many parasitic plants are associated with different plant hosts. The part of the habitat that a species occupies for a limited time only (a season, a part of a day) or for a particular purpose (feeding, reproduction) is called a station. The habitat of a biocenosis is called a biotope.

REFERENCES

Naumov, N. P. Ekologiia zhivotnykh, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1963.
Osnovy lesnoi biogeotsenologii. Edited by V. N. Sukachev and N. V. Dylis. Moscow, 1964.

N. P. NAUMOV

habitat

[′hab·ə‚tat]
(ecology)
The part of the physical environment in which a plant or animal lives.

Habitat

(networking, graphics)
The original term for on-line graphical virtual communities or worlds. Created at Lucasfilm in 1985 by Randy Farmer and Chip Morningstar.

http://communities.com/habitat.html.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nevertheless, the floristic delineation of the habitats around the three pans is clearer than would have been the case using the overall classification as described above.
The data base included each bird's name, physical description, adaptations for survival, main foods, and habitat.
As humans build logging roads and develop farmland, what habitat remains becomes fragmented (broken into smaller, unconnected pieces).
This research clearly indicates more organisms inhabit the SAG habitat either SAV or NVSB habitats per square meter of seabed throughout the year.
The small, buff-colored toad measures 2 to 3 inches, and has lost about 75 percent of its historical habitat due to urban development, recreation, dam construction and other human activities, officials said.
Experts say administrators generally have to be sold on how these benefits can outweigh the costs and time involved in creating and sustaining schoolyard habitats.
The system is also extremely important for imperiled species, providing habitat for nearly 250 threatened and endangered species.
It's doing that by filling in agricultural fields that previously broke up the forest, forming huge amounts of "edge" habitat.
The Santa Clarita Valley was one of the more than 200 sites studied and became representative of what has happened to native habitat and wildlife in Southern California.
They're trying to create new habitats (places to live and grow) for the Chiricahua leopard frog, a rare species native to Arizona and New Mexico.
It's not just in places like India or Zimbabwe that endangered plant and animal species are battling it out with growing numbers of people for the few remaining parcels of habitat.