Habitat

(redirected from Habitats)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial.

habitat

the environment in which an animal or plant normally lives or grows

Habitat

The sum of the environmental conditions that determine the existence of a community in a specific place where humans, animals, plants, and microorganisms live and its surroundings, both living and nonliving.

Habitat

 

an area of land or water occupied by an organism, a group of a single species, a biocenosis, or a synousia and possessing all conditions required for its existence (climate, topography, soil, food).

The habitat of a species is defined as the total area within the species’ range of distribution that satisfies the species’ ecological requirements. The habitat of a population is the part of the species’ habitat that will guarantee the existence of a population. The habitat of an individual is the actual area occupied by a given individual in all phases of its development. There are also animal habitats of family, herd, flock, or colony. There are plant habitats of groves, beds, and other communities. In terms of the use of a habitat, organisms are classified as stenotopic, occupying similar habitats only, and eurytopic, capable of occupying a variety of habitats within the given range of distribution.

The habitats of many species vary with the stage of development in the organism’s life cycle. For example, the larvae of amphibians usually live in water, and the adults on land. Many parasites have a dormant phase outside the given host and an active phase within the host (often limited even to certain organs). The various developmental phases of many parasitic plants are associated with different plant hosts. The part of the habitat that a species occupies for a limited time only (a season, a part of a day) or for a particular purpose (feeding, reproduction) is called a station. The habitat of a biocenosis is called a biotope.

REFERENCES

Naumov, N. P. Ekologiia zhivotnykh, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1963.
Osnovy lesnoi biogeotsenologii. Edited by V. N. Sukachev and N. V. Dylis. Moscow, 1964.

N. P. NAUMOV

habitat

[′hab·ə‚tat]
(ecology)
The part of the physical environment in which a plant or animal lives.

Habitat

(networking, graphics)
The original term for on-line graphical virtual communities or worlds. Created at Lucasfilm in 1985 by Randy Farmer and Chip Morningstar.

http://communities.com/habitat.html.
References in periodicals archive ?
DENR officials are confident that the declaration of the BICH will create a conservation measure and a management regime crucial for the survival of the island's threatened species, just like in other areas that were declared critical habitats.
He said, 'The policy will ensure protection of endangered species of wildlife in relation to their status and factors about limiting propagation of wildlife both in natural habitat as well as in captivity'.
(2010), who compared three different habitats to find out the most preferred habitat of Grey francolin in Lehri Nature Park, Punjab, Pakistan, wild habitat-II (natural forest) having high IVI value for trees (31.18) and high frequency of shrubs having (52.5) was the preferred habitat for species with (0.540.2) individuals per hectare.
yellow=jaguar, green=healthy habitat, pink=habitat loss)
The main finding of the report is that the overall status of grassland, wetland and coastal habitat types is particularly poor.
Students took a pretest addressing content knowledge of bird adaptations for habitat and descriptive vocabulary one week before instruction began, and the posttest a week after the five-weeklong unit of study concluded.
At the same time, we estimate that the golden-cheeked warbler now numbers 5,374 males in 53,115 acres (21, 495 ha) of habitat, and the black-capped vireo numbers 4,834 to 8,261 males within 17,215 acres (6,967 ha) of habitat.
"Habitat loss is by far the worst threat facing these animals," says Alexander Harcourt, a primatologist at the University of California, Davis.
All free swimming organisms >5 mm in length collected from each of the three habitats were identified to the genus and species, and measured to the nearest millimeter using vernier calipers.
Schoolyard habitats and student achievement have also been linked, such as through the State Education and Environment Roundtable's 1999 report Closing the Achievement Gap.
"If someone could suggest to me what the anticipated changes in the weather and rainfall patterns might be for [the bird's] breeding and wintering ranges, we might be able to extrapolate some gross changes in habitats that may result, and then, with even less confidence, we might try to estimate what may happen to a habitat specialist like the golden-cheeked warbler in those landscapes," says Chuck Sexton, wildlife biologist at the Balcones Refuge.