hacktivist

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hacktivist

(HACKer acTIVIST) A person who demonstrates against a company or government agency by malicious technological means. Examples are causing a website to fail or slow down, or breaking into a computer system to obtain unauthorized information. In 2011, after MasterCard, Visa and PayPal cut off service to Wikileaks, hacktivists set up denial-of-service attacks against their websites. Hacktivists promote free availability of information on the Internet and may protest when actions inhibit this freedom. See hacker, Silk Road and denial-of-service attack.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, looking at the hacktivism incidents in 2019, it is expected that this year may see an uptick in attacks.
Hacktivism, cyber-terrorism and cyberwar: The activities of the uncivil society in cyberspace.
When considering the definition above, cyberterrorism does not include acts of hacktivism. Hacktivism is a term used by many scholars to describe the marriage of hacking with political activism.
Mark Hughes, CEO BT Security, said: "Organised crime has moved online while countries across the globe are also battling with hacktivism and cyber espionage.
Hacktivism, DDoS attacks and website defacements are a staple in this region.
Hacktivism, DDoS (distributed denial-of-service) attacks and website defacements remain a staple in the Mena region, added the new report from Trend Micro, a global leader in cybersecurity solutions, released at the ongoing Gitex Technology Week in Dubai, UAE.
In the Middle East and North Africa, hacktivism, DDoS attacks and website defacements are a staple.
Truppi has a wealth of experience with cybercrime, from data breaches and hacktivism to cyber extortion attempts.
Hacktivism -- "Think activist," he said, such as an "animal rights group trying to commit [a hack] in furtherance of political or societal idealogy."
The main categories of attacks are hacktivism, financial theft, data theft, ransomware, cyberespionage, cyberterrorism...
Of those affected organizations, 41 % claim that ransom was the motivation; 27% cite insider threats; and 26% cite either political "hacktivism" or competitive gain as the motivation.
The first one is hacktivism " when criminals launch attacks based on their ideology; the second is done with intent to destabilise a company, and the third is the one where most people resort to cyber crime for financial rewards.