Hadley cell

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Hadley cell

[′had·lē ‚sel]
(meteorology)
A direct, thermally driven, and zonally symmetric circulation first proposed by George Hadley as an explanation for the trade winds; it consists of the equatorward movement of the trade winds between about latitude 30° and the equator in each hemisphere, with rising wind components near the equator, poleward flow aloft, and finally descending components at about latitude 30° again.
References in periodicals archive ?
One minute we're fighting freezing winds onboard a ship bound for Antarctica (seepage 54), the next we're studying the relationship between oxygen and hydrogen atoms before, suddenly, we're observing Hadley cells up in the atmosphere.
The dominant north-south circulation pattern on Titan consists of Hadley cells that extend from the latitude of maximum heating (e.g., the equator at equinox) all the way to the poles.
Sub-tropical regions are vulnerable to summer drought due to an atmospheric phenomenon known as the Hadley Cells
its boundaries defined by high-altitude features such as the jet stream and circulation patterns known as Hadley cells.
It is possibly linked to the expansion of the Hadley cell. This circulation of air is a large-scale movement by which heat is distributed from the equator to the tropics, on opposite sides of the globe.