Hadley cell

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Hadley cell

[′had·lē ‚sel]
(meteorology)
A direct, thermally driven, and zonally symmetric circulation first proposed by George Hadley as an explanation for the trade winds; it consists of the equatorward movement of the trade winds between about latitude 30° and the equator in each hemisphere, with rising wind components near the equator, poleward flow aloft, and finally descending components at about latitude 30° again.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wang, C., 2005: ENSO, Atlantic climate variability and the Walker and Hadley circulations. The Hadley Circulation: Present, Past and Future.
This important type of flow is called Hadley circulation that was first named after Hadley [13].
The Lorenz-84 model involves just three ordinary differential equations, and it includes some important features of Hadley circulation. So far, this model was known to have a pair of coexisting climates described originally by Lorenz [18].
Raymond, The Hadley Circulation: Present, Past, and Future, vol.
Yu, "Dynamical analysis of a low-order model representing Hadley circulation," Beijingjiaotong University, vol.
This so-called Hadley circulation ensures that most dust lofted into the atmosphere in the tropics doesn't travel to other parts of the world.
This provided a weaker driving force for the Hadley circulation, and Chylek's calculations show that the warm, high-altitude tropical air may have reached latitudes of only 27 [degrees] before it fell back to Earth.
Real-world applications of the Hadley circulation are presented using advanced graphics [Integrated Data Viewer (IDV) by Unidata (2012)] to highlight connections to the laboratory experiment.
2) low rotation, [OMEGA] = small [less than one revolution per minute (rpm)], an analog of the circulation of the tropical atmosphere, the Hadley circulation;
EXAMPLE OF PEDAGOGY: HADLEY CIRCULATION. Laboratory experiments.
He also applied these theoretical approaches and related entropy, energy, and angular momentum conservation principles to the First Global Atmospheric Research Project (GARP) Global Experiment (FGGE) and Global Weather Experiment (GWE) data to describe the equator-to-polar extent of the Hadley circulation and embedded Ferrei cells.