hemolytic anemia

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Related to Haemolytic disease: Haemolytic disease of newborn

hemolytic anemia

[¦hē·mə¦lid·ik ə′nē·mē·ə]
(medicine)
A decrease in the blood concentration of hemoglobin and the number of erythrocytes, due to the inability of the mature erythrocytes to survive in the circulating blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
51] Harvey Klein and David Anstee observed that in Rh-D haemolytic disease, infants might have a strongly positive DAT without showing any clinical signs of disease.
At a later stage of the pregnancy, these antibodies can cross through the placenta and enter the blood of the foetus, increasing the chances of destroying the red blood cells of the foetus and causing anaemia, a condition known as the Haemolytic Disease of the Newborn or Rhesus disease.
The safety of RhIG in the prevention of haemolytic disease of the newborn.
Literature points out that the first D positive infant born in a previously unimmunised woman might have a positive DAT, but very seldom showed clinical signs of haemolytic disease.
Keywords: Anti Cw antibody, Immunoglobulin, Haemolytic disease.
Haemolytic disease of the new-born due to anti-D antibodies in a [D.
They include the clotting agent Factor VIII, used for the treatment of haemophilia, immunoglobulins, which are used in the treatment of a range of diseases such as tetanus and the prevention of haemolytic disease of the newborn through the treatment of rhesus negative mothers, and albumin, used in the treatment of burns and serious accidents and a stabiliser in some vaccines.
The relative frequency of ABO Haemolytic disease of foetus and newborn (HDFN) varied in different populations.
ABO incompatibility is a leading cause of neonatal jaundice and haemolytic disease of foetus and newborn (HDFN) in countries with high human development index.
Haemolytic disease of foetus and newborn (HDFN), portrayed as 'foetus carnosus' by Hippocrates, had always scripted its exigent presence in the frontiers of transfusion immunology.
The most common cause of jaundice in the first 24 hours of life due to haemolytic disease of newborn (HDN) is rhesus (Rh) haemolytic disease followed by ABO incompatibility that may cause elevated levels of bilirubin and anaemia but less severe than Rh haemolytic disease.