haemophilia

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haemophilia

(US), hemophilia
an inheritable disease, usually affecting only males but transmitted by women to their male children, characterized by loss or impairment of the normal clotting ability of blood so that a minor wound may result in fatal bleeding
www.hemophilia.org
References in periodicals archive ?
Giving routine blood samples at quarterly reviews, the stored blood of haemophiliacs could be monitored at regular intervals before, during and following the onset of an infectious disease.
The inquiry, long demanded by Ms Grayson and fellow campaigners, aims to establish how more than 4,600 haemophiliacs were allowed to be given transfusions of blood infected with hepatitis, HIV, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and more.
Advising the inquiry on how to proceed, he called for investigation into claims by his clients of a cover-up by NHS bosses and ministers, and allegations that some involved "profited" from the "exploitation of haemophiliacs".
From 1985 to two years ago we had six members of our family, all haemophiliacs, affected by HIV.
Haemophiliac Andrew March was nine when he was injected with tainted blood at Coventry and Warwickshire Hospital.
The aim of this organization is to form a specialized treatment network to establish continuous and dynamic evaluation of treatment trends in the light of new discoveries and modify the standards of treatments to incorporate the new discoveries into the management of haemophiliacs. Prevention of the complications of haemophilia is an additional key aspect in the comprehensive care organization.
This blood and other blood products were used during operations in the UK and given to haemophiliacs to help their blood to clot and stop the risk of bleeding following minor bumps and bruises and full scale surgery.
The spokesman, who also contracted HIV and Hepatitis C as a result of receiving factor eight, added that although the outcome of the case when it came Britain would not change his or other sufferers' eventual fate, haemophiliacs given the treatment should be adequately compensated for the illnesses which are among the most "stigmatised in the world".
Ian Franklin, professor of transfusion medicine at the University of Glasgow, told the independent probe into the deaths of nearly 2,000 haemophiliacs exposed to HIV and Hepatitis C that concerns about HIV/Aids infection were first raised in 1983.
Nearly 2,000 haemophiliacs exposed to the fatal viruses in contaminated blood or blood products more than 20 years ago have since died and many others are said to be terminally ill.