Assad, Hafiz al-

(redirected from Hafiz Assad)

Assad, Hafiz al-

 

Born Oct. 6, 1930, in Qardaha, in the muhafaza (governorate) of Latakia. Syrian state and political figure. Lieutenant general.

The son of a peasant, al-Assad graduated from the Air Force Academy in Haleb (Aleppo) in 1955. From 1964 to 1970 he commanded the air force and the air defense of the Syrian Arab Republic (SAR); in 1966 he assumed the post of minister of defense as well. He held the posts of prime minister and minister of defense in the government formed by him in November 1970. In March 1971 al-Assad became president of the SAR and in August of that year was elected secretary general of the Arab Socialist Renaissance Party of the SAR. In March 1972 al-Assad became chairman of the National Progressive Front of the SAR.

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Along with King Khaled bin Abdulaziz, this summit included the participation of President Anwar Sadat, Sheikh Jaber Al-Ahmad, President Hafiz Assad, President Elias Sharkis and Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat -- all figures who have departed from this world.
The Homs Military Academy played a major role after Syria's independence in 1946, with many of its predominantly Alawi graduates becoming generals and mounting a series of coups, the last one led by Hafiz Assad - native of Qurdaha, an Alawi village near Latakia - in 1971.
Turk founded the Syrian Communist Party/Political Bureau in the 1970s, a democratic opposition to the country's mainstream CP, led by Khalid Bekdash, which had made a pragmatic accommodation with the regime of Hafiz Assad.
But the house that the shrewd and brutish Hafiz Assad built, and bis clumsy and brutish son Bashar inherited, may not survive the political upheaval that is now sweeping parts of the Arab Middle East, and that has already led to the collapse of the military dictators who had ruled Egypt, Tunisia, and Libya for as long as the Assads were in power.
After the meeting, Rubin writes, "Hafiz did take action: He had the three Jordanian agents who supplied the information tracked down and killed." The upshot was that "Syria kept on fomenting terrorism; and the United States did very little in retaliation." Baker had thought he and Hafiz Assad were playing by the same rule book.
Hafiz Assad remains the master of Syria, Saddam Hussein is unshaken as the boss of Iraq.
In fact, Hafiz Assad conspired in the war against his country and against his own leader and shortly wrested for power in a revolution.
Since the seizure of power by air force commander General Hafiz Assad in 1971 in the internal struggle in the eight-year old Baathist regime, Syria has depended primarily on the Soviet Union/Russia for advanced weaponry.
You could start with 2000 -- the Israeli military's flight from south Lebanon and the death of Syrian President Hafiz Assad. The same is true of 2005, with the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafik Hariri, the mass demonstrations of March 8 and 14, and the exeunt of the Syrian military from Lebanese soil.
IT is quite evident that former Syrian President Hafiz Assad succeeded in building a strong security force to support the regime he re-established in the autumn of 1970.