Salve Regina

(redirected from Hail, Holy Queen)

Salve Regina

(säl`vā rājē`nə) [Lat.,=hail, queen], prayer or hymn to the Virgin Mary, traditionally said, usually in the vernacular, after Low Mass and also, during part of the year, at vespers (in Latin) as an antiphon. It begins, "Hail, holy queen, mother of mercy."
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
References in periodicals archive ?
One sister prayed the "Hail, Holy Queen" before she died: "O most gracious advocate, turn thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this, our exile ...
I've become accustomed to falling asleep to the words of the Hail, Holy Queen. In my dark room, I offer this prayer of lament and find hope in its promise of deliverance.
At the conclusion of the prayer, the ritual offers the option of saying one of several different prayers addressed to Mary, including the Hail, Holy Queen. Hail, Holy Queen, mother of mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope.
At the end of a gathering of clergy, whether it was formal or informal, Tom insisted that they chant the Hail, Holy Queen in Latin as they had done in the seminary.
The second eloquent prayer to the Virgin Mary is the Salve Regina that begins "Hail, Holy Queen." Poetically it is an apostrophe, and if it does not rival Milton or Dryden in its elegance, it contains phrases of surpassing beauty.