Hakluyt


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Related to Hakluyt: Richard Hakluyt

Hakluyt

Richard. ?1552--1616, English geographer, who compiled The Principal Navigations, Voyages, and Discoveries of the English Nation (1589)
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For instance, in his letter of 3 September 1585 to Richard Hakluyt, Ralph Lane, who, together with Sir Richard "Greeneuill" [Grenville] had been commissioned by Raleigh to set up the first colony in Virginia, described the land in extremely exotic terms:
The way in which Woolf repeatedly engages with Hakluyt's works as a young reader and as an author suggests that she finds productive ambivalence in them.
Another travelling text, which relied on translation, was also a possible source for Shakespeare's Othello, written by Richard Hakluyt's friend John Pory, who translated the English edition published in London in 1600, A Geographical Historie of Africa written in Arabicke and Italian by John Leo a More ..., a translation of a text published in 1556 by Hasan Ibn Muhammad Al-Wazzan Al-Fasi, known in the West as Leo Africanus.
Hakluyt was an Elizabethan subject and, consequently, he cannot but blame Columbus' deceitfulness, instead of Henry VII's inaction, for what, at the time, was considered a catastrophic historical failure.
He begins by unpacking English patriotism and the myth of English freedom, using a diverse range of sources from Chaucer, Hakluyt, and antiquarians like Lambarde (21-33).
Schleck argued in part that the reliance of contemporary critics to draw primarily from Hakluyt's collection of travel narratives potentially reinscribes a narrative colonialism.
The brief entry on him in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography notes that his dates of birth and death are unknown, that he was probably from Devonshire (Robarts claims an association with Drake on this basis in his pamphlets), that, on the evidence of his texts, he served in some capacity as a seaman, and that he is likely to be other than the Henry Roberts who went as ambassador to Morocco in 1585, the source of a report included in Richard Hakluyt's Principal Navigations.