Halcyone


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Halcyone

(hălsī`ənē) or

Alcyone

(ăl–), in Greek mythology, daughter of Aeolus and wife of Ceyx. When her husband drowned, Halcyone threw herself into the sea. Out of pity the gods changed the pair into kingfishers or halcyons, and Zeus forbade the winds to blow seven days before and after the winter solstice, the breeding season of the halcyon. The expression "halcyon days" comes from this myth and figuratively means a time of peace and tranquility.
References in periodicals archive ?
The story of Halcyone (or Alcyone) and Ceyx lacks the sensational and scandalous dimension of Hamlet's story, even though Ceyx's death is represented as the supreme god Zeus's revenge for Ceyx's and Halcyone's blasphemous habit of calling each other by the names of Zeus and Hera to suggest that the immortal gods can envy them their happiness (see Graves 1960: 163-165).
Geoffrey Chaucer uses Ovid's story about Ceyx and Halcyone in his early poem entitled The book of the Duchess.
In this case it does not seem to matter much that Halcyone sees what might be called a phantom of a phantom of her husband, but we have here clearly to do with the problem of the true identity of ghosts.