Haldane's rule


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Haldane's rule

[′hȯl‚dānz ‚rül]
(genetics)
The rule that if one sex in a first generation of hybrids between species is rare, absent, or sterile, then it is the heterogametic sex.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, they suggest that Haldane's rule and its genetic basis may not be solely established in spermiogenesis but also in the premeiotic stages of spermatogenesis.
Evolution of postmating reproductive isolation: the composite nature of Haldane's rule and its genetic bases.
Causes of sex-ratio bias may account for unisexual sterility in hybrids: a new explanation of Haldane's rule and related phenomena.
Haldane's rule and its legacy: why are there so many sterile males?
However, consideration of other taxa suggests that the second scenario is not a general explanation of Haldane's rule.
Although Haldane's rule applies to asymmetrical sterility or viability between homogametic and heterogametic hybrids in most diploid species, it is not directly relevant to species with other sex determination systems simply because they lack sex chromosomes and a heterogametic sex.
Haplodiploids may provide new insights concerning the genetic basis of reproductive isolation, as well as Haldane's rule because of male hemizygosity.
Where detailed genetic analysis has been possible, Haldane's rule (sex-limited sterility) has been traced to disruptive transepistatic interactions among specific sites on sex chromosomes and autosomes (Coyne 1984; Orr 1987, 1989; Zouros et al.
Several other zones show evidence of Haldane's rule (e.
This result is therefore again significant, and does not include the extra information that the ancestral state obeyed Haldane's rule.
If we assume that the a priori probabilities are 1/2 in each taxon, the probability that the birds and mammals each obey Haldane's rule is a quarter.
One recently proposed evolutionary explanation posits that both Haldane's rule and large sex-chromosome effects results from genes that cause meiotic drive (Frank, 1991a; Hurst and Pomiankowski, 1991).