minim

(redirected from Half-note)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

minim

1. a unit of fluid measure equal to one sixtieth of a drachm. It is approximately equal to one drop.
2. Music a note having the time value of half a semibreve
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

minim

[′min·əm]
(mechanics)
A unit of volume in the apothecaries' measure; equals ¹⁄₆₀ fluidram (approximately 0.061612 cubic centimeter) or about 1 drop (of water). Abbreviated min.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In misinterpreting the half-note pulse, the performance tempo was bound to be twice as slow as it was meant to be.
IF you match a corresponding left and right half-note of the same cash amount, you've won that cash prize!
At times the engraver also left out stems or used incorrect punches that resulted in the printing of wrong note-values, such as quarter-notes for half-notes or half-notes for whole-notes.
For instance, the first occurrence of this triple-over-duple meter is seen in the second half of measure 7, where the compound rhythm between the viola and 'cello is, in fact, a triplet over a half-note value.
Many teachers tell their students to breath between the half-note and quarter note of measure 4, while other teachers have their students breath at the measure (on the bar-line).
In measure 4 of the first "Hymn," for instance, Bass I requires either a dot after its whole-note (tied from the previous bar) or a half-note rest.
It is no wonder, with such musical development, particularly in homes where music is valued and frequently heard, that children can be readied to read and even write quarter-, eighth- and half-note rhythms by school age.
Recitative barlines were treated in a cavalier fashion in all Italian operas of this time; the C mensuration in recitatives did not distinguish between the accentuation of the first and the second half-note, and rather corresponded to our [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
The rising and falling octave scales upon which this section is built, in a consistent half-note, quarter-note rhythm, are articulated in the first Artaria edition of 1799 by slurs covering each individual measure.
To demonstrate the fundamental importance of rhythm in music, play for your beginning student the melody of Jingle Bells using an incorrect rhythm--perhaps 3/4 time with a quarter-note, half-note pattern--and ask the student to identify the tune.