halide

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halide:

see halogenhalogen
[Gr.,=salt-bearing], any of the chemically active elements found in Group 17 of the periodic table; the name applies especially to fluorine (symbol F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), and iodine (I).
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halide

[′ha‚līd]
(chemistry)
A compound of the type MX, where X is fluorine, chlorine, iodine, bromine, or astatine, and M is another element or organic radical.
References in periodicals archive ?
The aim of this study is to examine the effect of halide ions on nickel in perchloric acid medium.
Using a database of 89 genes from plants, fungi, and bacteria known to produce methyl halides, the researchers identified genes that were the most likely to produce the highest levels of these substances.
Because halides can be associated with post-solder corrosion, no-clean fluxes containing halides will always contain rosin to encapsulate any leftover, un-reacted ionic material and ensure electrochemical reliability.
T-5 lamps hold 95 percent of their initial light level compared to 60-70 percent for metal halide.
Many of the natural sources of methyl halide gases haven't been identified, says Kelly R.
After monitoring methyl halide gases emitted from a rice paddy in Maxwell, Calif.
Comparing metal halide and high-pressure sodium lamps, they are highly efficient, compact light sources that are relatively immune to ambient temperature effects.
Daylight halides are also used by people with terrariums and those who need objects illuminated to reveal their "true colors," such as quilters, photographers, painters and other artists.
Wetting characteristics and reactivity of molten halides increase significantly above 1325-1350F.
Officials at the Bowden Ice Arena in Alberta, Canada, swapped out 36 400-W metal halide luminaires for the same number of high-bay LED luminaires (from Albeo Technologies), not only for the projected energy savings but to give hockey players and spectators a better look at the disc.
This technique, Combustion Ion Chromatography, is used to determine halides and sulfur content in coal, crude oil, naphtha, alkylates, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) and related materials.