Hall coefficient


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Hall coefficient

[′hȯl ‚kō·i′fish·ənt]
(electromagnetism)
A measure of the Hall effect, equal to the transverse electric field (Hall field) divided by the product of the current density and the magnetic induction. Also known as Hall constant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Note that this is a different effect than the well-known piezo-Hall effect [52], which describes the change of a material property--the Hall coefficient [C.sub.H]--caused by mechanical stress.
At constant magnetic field of 2790 Gauss, applied current was varied and the corresponding voltages were measured to calculate the Hall Coefficients. Average of all values was used to calculate donor density.
Mobility Hall coefficient Sample ([cm.sup.2]/V*S) ([cm.sup.3]/Cb) [Cu.sub.1.4] Te 13.82 0.0042 Carrier concentration Sample ([cm.sup.-3]) [Cu.sub.1.4] Te 1.48 x [10.sup.21] Table 2: Device parameters for CdTe solar cells with or without [Cu.sub.1.4] Te thin films.
van der, "A Method of Measuring the Resistivity and Hall Coefficient on Lamellae of Arbitrary Shape".
The electrical properties of the films, such as the carrier concentration, Hall mobility, Hall coefficient, and sheet resistance, were characterized by four-point probe and Hall effect measurements (HMS-3000 Manual Ver 3.5.1) at room temperature.
Carrier concentration, Hall mobility, Hall coefficient, and sheet resistance values were obtained by four-point probe technique using Hall effect measurement system in a magnetic field strength of 0.556 T and these values were listed in Table 3.
The values of the Hall coefficient, carrier concentration, resistivity, and mobility of the CZTS film 3 using the Van der Pauw geometry were 4.9 x [10.sup.2] [cm.sup.3][C.sup.-1], 1.25 x [10.sup.16] [cm.sup.-3], 7.6 [OMEGA]cm, and 65 [cm.sup.2][V.sup.-1][s.sup.-1], respectively.
The Hall coefficient measurements were performed in a constant magnetic field (1T) and electric current (50 mA) using the van der Pauw method at room temperature.