Halleck, Fitz-Greene

Halleck, Fitz-Greene

(hăl`ĭk), 1790–1867, American poet, b. Guilford, Conn. He was joint author, with Joseph Rodman Drake, of the humorous lampoons "Croaker Papers," most of which were printed in the New York Evening Post in 1819. In the same year he published his long satire, Fanny (1819), in the style of Byron's Beppo. His poem "Marco Bozzaris," popular as a recitation, and his "Green Be the Turf above Thee," an elegy on the death of Drake, were the best known of Halleck's graceful verses. For many years he was personal secretary to John Jacob Astor.
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Halleck, Fitz-Greene

(1790–1867) poet; born in Guilford, Conn. He was educated in public schools, was a store clerk (1806–11), bank clerk (1812–30), and personal secretary to John Jacob Astor (1832–49) in New York. He was noted for his satiric verse, such as Fanny (1819), but is now best known for his historical poems such as "Marco Bozzaris."
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.