Hallowell, Alfred Irving

Hallowell, Alfred Irving

(hăl`əwĕl'), 1892–1974, American anthropologist, b. Philadelphia, grad. Univ. of Pennsylvania (B.S., 1914; A.M., 1920; Ph.D., 1924). He was a professor of anthropology at the Univ. of Pennsylvania from 1927 to 1944 and from 1947 to 1963. From 1944 to 1947 he was professor of anthropology at Northwestern Univ. He concerned himself especially with personality and culture, Native Americans, and social organization. Among his writings are Bear Ceremonialism in the Northern Hemisphere (1926), The Role of Conjuring in Saulteaux Society (1942), and Culture and Experience (1955).
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Hallowell, Alfred Irving

(1892–1974) cultural anthropologist; born in Philadelphia. He graduated from Pennsylvania's Wharton School of Finance and was a social worker before turning to the study of anthropology. An authority on the Northern Ojibwa Indians, he published many studies of the tribes and made important contributions to culture-and-personality theory. His Culture and Experience appeared in 1955.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.