hall

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hall,

a communicating passageway or, in medieval buildings, the large main room. In the feudal castle of N Europe it was a single apartment, and in it lord and retainers lounged, ate, and slept. From the hearth in its center the smoke rose to an outlet in the roof. At one end was the raised dais reserved for the master and those of his own rank. With developing amenities extra spaces were added for cooking and sleeping, and the hall advanced beyond its early rude and unfinished appearance. In English manor houses of the 14th and 15th cent. the characteristic great hall was covered by a fine open-timber roof, heated by one or more huge fireplaces, and lighted with lofty windows often arranged in deep, projecting bays. Westminster Hall, part of the ancient royal palace commenced in the 11th cent. and rebuilt in the 14th cent., was the most splendid. By the 17th cent., with the addition of drawing room, library, and bedrooms, the hall of the English house was no longer of great size and dominance. The English colleges of the Middle Ages and Renaissance also had halls or commons, chiefly for dining, that were architecturally similar to the baronial examples. Some were covered with fine fan vaults, others with timber roofs as at Christ Church, Oxford, perhaps the most splendid hall next to Westminster. The various guilds of N Europe had their halls, especially impressive in Flanders, e.g., the cloth halls at Bruges, Brussels, and Ypres. In Italy communal independence produced the remarkable series of local civic halls, often with imposing towers, as at Siena and Florence. The word hall came to be used in the title of many great English houses (Haddon Hall) and similarly in that of some Southern estates in the American colonies.

Bibliography

See J. A. Gotch, Growth of the English House (1909).

Hall

A large room or building used for the transaction of public business and the holding of courts of justice; used also for public meetings and assemblies and other entertainment.

hall

1. The main room of a medieval or post-medieval house that served as the center of family life, usually combining the functions of a kitchen, dining room, living room, and workroom for activities such as spinning, sewing, and candle making; often called a keeping room; also see hall-and-parlor plan.
2. An imposing entrance hall; also called a living hall.
3. A large room for assembly, entertainment, and the like.
4. A small, relatively primitive dwelling having a one-room plan.
6. A corridor.

hall

1. a room serving as an entry area within a house or building
2. a building for public meetings
3. the great house of an estate; manor
4. a large building or room used for assemblies, worship, concerts, dances, etc.
5. a residential building, esp in a university; hall of residence
6. 
a. a large room, esp for dining, in a college or university
b. a meal eaten in this room
7. the large room of a house, castle, etc.
8. US and Canadian a passage or corridor into which rooms open
9. Informal short for music hall

Hall

1. Charles Martin. 1863--1914, US chemist: discovered the electrolytic process for producing aluminium
2. Sir John. 1824--1907, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister of New Zealand (1879--82)
3. Sir Peter. born 1930, English stage director: director of the Royal Shakespeare Company (1960--73) and of the National Theatre (1973--88)
4. (Margueritte) Radclyffe. 1883--1943, British novelist and poet. Her frank treatment of a lesbian theme in the novel The Well of Loneliness (1928) led to an obscenity trial
References in classic literature ?
As the doors at the lower end of the Hall closed behind him O-Tar the Jeddak stood alone with the great dead.
The Ribbons opened an account at the Mudbury Branch Savings Bank; the Ribbons drove to church, monopolising the pony-chaise, which was for the use of the servants at the Hall.
Some one broke into hysterical laughter, a woman sobbed, and then Norman of Torn, wiping his blade upon the rushes of the floor as he had done upon another occasion in that same hall, spoke quietly to the master of Leybourn.
Seryozha understood at once that what the hall porter was speaking of was a present from Countess Lidia Ivanovna for his birthday.
He greeted them with joy, and after feasting and song the Danes and their King departed and left the Goths to guard the hall.
Weedon Scott pressed a button, and the staircase and downstairs hall were flooded with light.
Saxon could see Hall pointing down across the fissure and imagined he was showing some curious thing to Billy.
I was a boy in my teens at the time of my father's death and had never seen the Hall, for he lived in a little cottage on the South Coast.
I'll introduce him, Anna, just as soon as we get to the hall.
It was no easy matter on that day, to force one's way into that grand hall, although it was then reputed to be the largest covered enclosure in the world (it is true that Sauval had not yet measured the grand hall of the Château of Montargis).
Whether they had, or had not, obtained the situation of which they were in search, neither Miss Redwood nor any one else at the Hall could tell.
David's Hall at half-past nine yesterday morning, and he certainly arrived in Yarmouth at a little before twelve.