Halocarbon

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halocarbon

[¦ha·lō¦kär·bən]
(organic chemistry)
A compound of carbon and a halogen, sometimes with hydrogen.

Halocarbon

Class of man-made chemicals, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), whose heat-trapping properties are among the most damaging of the greenhouse gases. This, coupled with their tendency to remain in the atmosphere for hundreds of years, has resulted in limits on their use. Halocarbons are most commonly used in refrigeration, air conditioning, and electrical systems, as well as blowing agents in some foam insulation products.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some halocarbons such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), previously
Harmful chemicals that have led to increased greenhouse gas concentrations include: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons (regulated by Montreal), and other halogenated substances such as CFCs and HCFCs.
Carbon Dioxide 50% Methane 20% Nitrous Oxide 5% Halocarbons 15% Ozone 10% Note: Table made from pie chart.
5) The four principal greenhouse gases emitted by anthropogenic activities are carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and halocarbons.
Because carbon dioxide and many of the halocarbons have very long atmospheric lifetimes, the increased concentrations are likely to result in an enhanced greenhouse effect in the future.
Emissions of carbon dioxide and particularly halocarbons have increased significantly between 1990 and 2005.
2] and which generate hypohalous acids and various halocarbons, such as bromoform (CH[Br.