Halocarbon

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halocarbon

[¦ha·lō¦kär·bən]
(organic chemistry)
A compound of carbon and a halogen, sometimes with hydrogen.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

Halocarbon

Class of man-made chemicals, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), whose heat-trapping properties are among the most damaging of the greenhouse gases. This, coupled with their tendency to remain in the atmosphere for hundreds of years, has resulted in limits on their use. Halocarbons are most commonly used in refrigeration, air conditioning, and electrical systems, as well as blowing agents in some foam insulation products.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some halocarbons such as chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), previously
hydrofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, halons (which are halocarbon
The newly constructed 30,000 square foot facility is part of a three-phase program to contain and manage Class I and II Ozone Depleting Substances (ODS) and other halocarbons.
Critical evaluation of sampling and gas chromatographic analysis of halocarbons and other organic air pollutants.
While C[O.sub.2] is the largest contributor to greenhouse emissions, John Waycuilis from Marathon Oil said that Methane (C[H.sub.4]), Nitrus Oxide (N20), Halocarbons, and 03 levels in the atmosphere have also risen abruptly in the last century or so.
Aust 1996 "Compounds and methods for reductive dehalogenation of aliphatic halocarbons." U.S.
The starting point for this theory was their discovery in the south of Russia and South Africa that microbial processes in present-day salt lakes naturally produce and emit highly volatile halocarbons such as chloroform, trichloroethene, and tetrachloroethene.
Harmful chemicals that have led to increased greenhouse gas concentrations include: carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, halocarbons (regulated by Montreal), and other halogenated substances such as CFCs and HCFCs.
Carbon Dioxide 50% Methane 20% Nitrous Oxide 5% Halocarbons 15% Ozone 10% Note: Table made from pie chart.
(5) The four principal greenhouse gases emitted by anthropogenic activities are carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide and halocarbons. (6) The atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has increased from a pre-industrial value of 280 ppm (parts per million) to 379 ppm in 2005, primarily because of the burning of fossil fuels and changes in land use.