Halophytes


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Related to Halophytes: Glycophytes

Halophytes

 

plants growing in soils with a high salt content; for example, those along the seashore or in salt marshes.

Halophytes are divided into three groups. (1) Salt plants (euhalophytes or true halophytes), the cells of which contain a protoplasm highly resistant to strong concentrations of salt (primarily sodium chloride and sodium sulfate), which they store in considerable quantities. They usually have fleshy leaves and stems. In the USSR prevalent salt plants are glasswort, herbaceous sea blite, and a number of desert semishrubs. (2) Crinohalophytes, which are able to excrete the salt accumulated in them by means of special glands covering the leaves and stems. In dry weather they are covered with a thick coating of salt, which is subsequently partly blown off by the wind and partly washed off by rain. This group includes such plants as sea lavender and tamarisk, which are found in semidesert and dry steppe regions. (3) Glycohalophytes, which have a root system absorbing only very little salt, so that no salt accumulates in their tissues. Among these are various wormwood plants that in the USSR cover vast expanses of salty semidesert. There are no real halophytes among cultivated plants, only plants having a greater or lesser resistance to salt.

References in periodicals archive ?
Apart from biofuel, halophytes may potentially generate by-products such as highly valuable chemicals, pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals, making the project commercially viable.
For instance, salt crystals were quite evident on leaf surfaces of the facultative halophyte P.
Waste seawater from a fish and shrimp farm will nourish halophytes that clean the water as they grow.
The research centres on assessing the potential for large-scale production of fuels from halophytes, algae, jatropha, castor and other potential biofuel materials.
The overall potential for sustainable, large-scale production of biofuels made from salicornia bigelovii and saltwater mangroves, plants known as halophytes, will be examined in the study.
rostratus) along the xeric coast of northern and central Sonora occur in sparse halophytes (Frankenia, Allenrolfia, Atriplex, Salicornia, Suaeda, Cressa, Distichlis, Monanthochloe, and Batis), whereas other populations of saltmarsh sparrows, with the exception of those on Islas San Benito, occur in dense marsh vegetation (in Bahia Magdalena they also occur in mangroves [Rhizophora mangle]).
Camelina and halophytes are two other promising second-generation options that have been successfully trialled.
NASA has estimated that halophytes planted over an area the size of the Sahara Desert could supply more than 90 percent of the world's energy needs.
Several studies on halophytes showed that salinity affects imbibition of water by seeds, and that some salt treated seeds would germinate after being washed with distilled water (Macke and Ungar, 1971; Redmann, 1972; Keiffer and Ungar, 1997; Bajji et al.
In the vicinity of this location only halophytes such as tamarix (salt cedar) and saltbush grow in a scattered pattern.