Oscar Hammerstein

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Hammerstein, Oscar

(hăm`ərstīn), 1846–1919, German-American operatic impresario. In 1888 he built the Harlem Opera House, and in 1906 the Manhattan Opera House, where he gave noteworthy productions. He brought many fine singers to the United States, and introduced Louise, Pelléas et Mélisande, and Elektra to the American public. In 1910 the Metropolitan Opera Company bought his interests. Upon the failure (1913) of an operatic venture in London, he returned to New York and built the Lexington Theater, where he produced varied entertainments.

Hammerstein, Oscar

(1846–1919) theatrical impresario; born in Stettin, Germany. Grandfather of Oscar Hammerstein II, he built several theaters, including the Manhattan Opera House in 1906, and brought many fine singers to the U.S.A.
References in periodicals archive ?
In chapter 4, Block moves on to Rodgers and Hammerstein's South Pacific, skipping entirely Oklahoma!, Carousel, and Allegro.
There is really no other way to describe the members of the cast of the movie of The Sound of Music," Ted Chapin, president and chief creative officer of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Organization, said in a statement.
BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTOR IN A LEADING ROLE IN A MUSICALBrooks Ashmanskas, The PromDerrick Baskin, Ain't Too Proud - The Life and Times of the TemptationsAlex Brightman, BeetlejuiceDamon Daunno, Rodgers & Hammerstein's Oklahoma!Santino Fontana, Tootsie
Legendary musical theater composers Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein -- both of whom died decades ago -- are among the credited writers of that song and own 90 percent of the songwriting royalties.
Purdum's Something Wonderful: Rodgers and Hammerstein's Broadway Revolution, and Andrew Lloyd Webber's memoir Unmasked.
Jessie Mueller, "Rodgers & Hammerstein's Carousel"
The movie featured some of Rodgers and Hammerstein's best loved songs, including Happy Talk, There is Nothing Like a Dame and Some Enchanted Evening.
Later this month at the same venue, "Rodgers + Hammerstein's Cinderella" (a 2013 Broadway revamp of three different TV versions)
Introduced by Ted Chapin of the Rodgers & Hammerstein Organization, "The King and I" is a complete manuscript of the famous Broadway musical production first brought to the stage in New York in 1951 and revived in multiple productions since that time.
Modelling of many nonlinear systems is based on Hammerstein and Wiener models, as can be also proven by many publications during last years.
The stage musical may have its roots in nineteenth century operetta, but Broadway composers like Jerome Kern and poets--also known as lyricists--like Oscar Hammerstein created a new type of musical theatre--sometimes (and often erroneously) labeled "musical comedy.