Hamsun


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Hamsun

Knut, , pen name of Knut Pedersen. 1859-- 1952, Norwegian novelist, whose works include The Growth of the Soil (1917): Nobel prize for literature 1920
References in periodicals archive ?
Divorced from its turn-of-the-century, Norwegian bourgeoisie milieu, Hamsun's proto-existential Portrait of the Artist as a Saintly Young Madman plays as pretentious and silly, particularly when the junior Culp's perf retains a vague "period" look and manner utterly incongruous with real LA.
Knut Hamsun's writing is magical, his sentences are glowing, he could write about anything and make it alive.
Peter Vedal Utnes explores the problem of scientific knowledge development, addressing the Post-Positivist Concept of Thomas Kuhn, Andreas Lodemel analyses the creativity of Knut Hamsun in the context of the outstanding Norwegian writer's understanding the border between the culture and nature and the role of the Sami people image in the interpretation of this border, the pedagogical and educational aspect of the border is analyzed in the texts of Inna Ryzhkova on internationalization of higher education and Jan Selmer Methi on the border zone as an arena of exceeding oneself, and the final chapter of the monograph is Viggo Rossvaer's meditations on Kant.
Jennifer Cowe analyzes Miller's much-read, but little studied, story "Max" in "What Are You Going to Do about Max: Understanding Anti-Semitism in 'Max,'" while Dixon Speaker investigates parallels between Tropic of Cancer and "Howl" in "'Holy the lone juggernaut': Miller, Ginsberg, and the Autobiography of the Individual." Omar Sabbagh looks at the Colossus of Maroussi in "Humanism after Humanism: Henry Miller: Colossus after Colossus," while Marcus De Vaca creatively studies "Big Sur and a Memorable Cup of Tea." Francesco Bozzi examines Hamsun, Joyce and Miller in "Movement, Sensation, and Perception: The Wanderings of the Artist and the Emergence of Modern Urbanity.
"To pass the time," replied Knut Hamsun. "That's what I ask myself," replied Jean Ajalbert.
There's also a Bigfoot/Sasquatch ritual project; a play loosely based on Mary Shelley called The Securely Conferred, Vouchsafed Keepsakes of Maery S.; a word-for-word translation of Norwegian playwright Knut Hamsun's Ved Rigets Port: Forspil; and adaptations of Ibsen's The Wild Duck (called Kyckling and Screaming) and An Enemy of the People infused with and informed by the work of rap giants Public Enemy and Chuck D.
Local author and Nazi sympathiser Knut Hamsun remains a divisive figure, and the museum in Presteid dedicated to the Nobel Prize winner is just as controversial.
Jan Kjaerstad's novel Rand (Verge) appeared in 1990, one hundred years after the Nobel prize winner Knut Hamsun's novel Suit (Hunger), and there are reasons to believe that it is an attempt to rewrite that novel, which is considered to be one of the most influential works of early modern writing.
According to the Telegraph, Pacino was slated to star in the Danish Avery-T theater's stage adaptation of Norwegian author Knut Hamsun's psychological thriller "Hunger." Hamsun, considered a pioneer of psychological literature, later became an advocate of the Nazis, showing immense support for their occupation of Norway during World War II.