hangover

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hangover

the delayed aftereffects of drinking too much alcohol in a relatively short period of time, characterized by headache and sometimes nausea and dizziness
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

hangover

[′haŋ‚ō·vər]
(communications)
In television, overlapping and blurring of successive frames opposite to direction of subject motion, due to improper adjustment of transient response.
In facsimile, distortion produced when the signal changes from maximum to minimum conditions at a slower rate than required, resulting in tailing on the lines in the recorded copy.
(medicine)
After effect of excessive intake of alcohol or certain drugs, such as barbiturates.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"For example, our study proves that hangovers reduce ability to engage in complex behaviors, and thus ability to drive, work, study or conduct other activities are impaired by hangover."
"Using white wine and lager beer, we didn't find any truth in the idea that drinking beer before wine gives you a milder hangover than the other way around," said first author Joran Kochling from Germany's Witten/Herdecke University.
Dr Kai Hensel, of Cambridge University, said: "Unpleasant as hangovers are, they can help us learn from our mistakes."
Participants, several of whom vomited, were asked about their hangover the following day and given a score on a so-called Acute Hangover Scale, based on factors including thirst, fatigue, headache, dizziness, nausea, stomach ache, increased heart rate and loss of appetite.
If you need a quick, short-term fix for your hangover, the age-old "hair of the dog that bit you" trick is one that works, according to (https://www.webmd.com/balance/features/hangover-helpers) WebMD .
But have you ever wondered how a hangover may influence your thoughts and behaviour?
[USA], Nov 21 ( ANI ): You're enjoying beer, cocktails with friends, and before you know it, night turns into day, and you wake up with a massive hangover.
Why do some drinks give you shocking hangovers and others seem kinder?
Taking painkillers can prevent a hangover FALSE - Dehydration is a major factor in causing hangovers, so taking painkillers won't help prevent one, said Dr Jarvis.
Pickle juice: Hold your nose and down this is a widely accepted hangover cure.
"With hangovers costing us an eye-watering two grand a year, you at least need to split the round fairly to avoid losing out even more.