Hanifism

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hanifism

 

one form of the monotheistic religious movement that arose in pre-Islamic Arabia; it was influenced by both Judaism and Christianity. The followers of Hanifism, who preached monotheism and asceticism, called for the abolition of tribal and local deities. Accepting neither Christianity nor Judaism entirely, they strove to create a relatively simple religious system that would be accessible to the inhabitants of Arabia of the sixth and early seventh centuries. Hanifism exerted a significant influence on early Islam. Its most active and consistent representative was the prophet Musaylimah, who died in 633.

REFERENCES

Beliaev, E. A. Araby, islam i arabskii khalifat v rannee srednevekov’e, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1966. Pages 103–108.
Petrushevskii, I. P. Islam v Irane v VII-XV vekakh. Leningrad, 1966. Pages 13–14.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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At the time of Muhammad in Arabia, there were Jews, Christians, Zoroastrians, and Hanifs, belonging to the monotheistic movement of Hanifism. Hanifism arose in the sixth century in west Arabia, in the Hizaz region.
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