Pinyin

(redirected from Hanyu Pinyin)
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Pinyin

(pĭn`yĭn`) [Chin. Hanyu pinyin = Chinese phonetic alphabet], system of romanization of Chinese written characters, approved in 1958 by the government of the People's Republic of China and officially adopted by it in 1979. Developed in the 1950s by a committee headed by Zhou Youguang, it was based on several earlier romanization systems, and replaced that those and the more complex Wade-Giles system (1859; modified 1912), among others. The reasons for adopting Pinyin included promoting a national language, establishing a means for writing non-Chinese (minority) languages in China, and encouraging foreigners to learn Chinese. Pinyin, which became more widely used in the West in the 1980s, was adopted officially in Taiwan in 2009 but is not used exclusively there.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The merits of using Zhuyin Fuhao as an alternative to Hanyu Pinyin are detailed as follows.
Table 1: Examples of the same sentence in the three systems English I like (on) Thursday Characters [phrase omitted] [phrase omitted] [phrase omitted] Hanyu Pinyin wo xi huan xing qAaAaAeA s Zhuyin Fuhao [phrase omitted] [phrase omitted] [phrase omitted] English to ride bicycle Characters [phrase omitted] [phrase omitted] Hanyu Pinyin qAaAaAeA zAaAaAeA xAaAaAeA Zhuyin Fuhao [phrase omitted] [phrase omitted] [Please note: Some non-Latin characters were omitted from this article]
However, elements of the Latinxua sinwenz did receive serious consideration in the effort to develop a Romanization for New China and did leave a legacy of sorts: the official Hanyu pinyin system ultimately adopted some of its spelling conventions, for example the dental sibilants z, c, s, the retroflex initials zh, ch, sh, and the prepalatal fricative x.
After the PRC's declaration to follow the Beijing standard, the Hanyu pinyin Romanization that the PRC designed under the auspices of Zhou Youguang [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] fully adopted the phonological framework of the zhuyin fuhao and GR, the counterpart Romanization to zhuyin fuhao.
Hanyu pinyin de gushi [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] Shanghai: Shaonian ertong chubanshe.
and the PRC up to the 1970s, as well as the conservatism of the personnel running most Chinese schools, the teaching of simplified characters and the Hanyu pinyin (Chinese phonetic alphabet) transliteration system, which had been the standard in the PRC since the 1950s, [37] was discouraged or ignored.
[38] It was followed in 1976 by the United Nations Chinese School of New York City (1990 Chinese population 246,817) at the United Nations, which in 1979 moved into New York Chinatown as the International Chinese School and became the first school in a major Chinatown to teach simplified characters and Hanyu pinyin. [39] However, such schools remained rarities among Chinese community schools in America until the late 1980s.
[53] However, because of a 1991 National Foreign Language Center survey, which showed that 68.1 percent of American high schools teaching Chinese were using Hanyu pinyin, the examinations were not designed to include any questions using zhuyin fuhao, or phonetic symbols.