New Zealand Flax

(redirected from Harakeke)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

New Zealand Flax

 

(Phormium tenax), a perennial herb of the Liliaceae family, sometimes classified in the Agavaceae family. It has sword-shaped leaves up to three m long arranged in two rows on a short stem. The branched blossom cluster, 1.5–4.5 m high, bears 250–460 red or yellow flowers, which are pollinated by birds. The fruit is a three-faceted pod. The leaves contain a strong fiber used for making twine, rope, ship rigging, and matting. New Zealand flax is native to New Zealand and Norfolk Island, where it grows in large thickets on moist plains and mountain slopes. It can withstand temperatures of –10°C. The plant is raised for both industrial and decorative purposes in many subtropical countries. In the Caucasus, along the Black Sea, New Zealand flax is grown in gardens and parks and on small plantations.

References in periodicals archive ?
Members working for Maori and iwi health providers, along with employer representatives, gathered in marae and other venues around the country last month to plait muka strands from harakeke.
1993) Tungia te Ururua, Kia Tupu Whakaritorito te Tepu o te Harakeke, MA thesis, University of Auckland.
Harakeke weaving has been underway in various parts of the country, as part of the regional activities supporting the Te Rau Kokiri (TRK) campaign.
Hutia te rito o te harakeke, Kei hea te komako e ko, Ki mai koe ki au He aha te mea nui o tenei ao, Maku e ki atu He tangata, he tangata, he tangata.
A range of activities is planned, culminating in local communities weaving a section of a harakeke mat.
One of the activities well supported was each community weaving a section of a harakeke mat, with these sections picked up from around the country by a campaign bus and then woven together to represent a mat covering Maori health in Aotearoa New Zealand.
One of the key local community activities being promoted to highlight the pay parity issue is that each local community will weave a section of a harakeke blanket.