Haraway, Donna

Haraway, Donna

(1944-) U.S. feminist social theorist who began her career as a biologist. This background informed her subsequent work in the field of the philosophy of science. Assessing the political considerations of scientific discourse, Haraway argues that the phallocentric model of knowledge is based on domination and oppression. Following the technological horrors of late modernity (such as Aucshwitz and Hiroshima), she maintains that we need a ‘successor science’ that promotes ethical considerations above the pursuit of money and prestige. For Haraway science is reductionist because it often overlooks difference. Against this exclusionary discourse her book Simians, Cyborgs and Women: The Reinvention of Nature (1991) promotes the figure of the cyborg as a metaphor for the negotiation of difference within the scientific model. Here, the biotechnological hybrid transgresses the boundaries of the integrated subject, promoting a fluid model of identity Although Haraway critiques science, she still argues in favour of its logical methodology unlike other postmodern theorists such as Jean-Francois LYOTARD whose book The Postmodern Condition (1984) appears to relativize knowledge by showing how science is just one of many competing ‘language games’. See also CYBERCULTURE.
References in periodicals archive ?
HARAWAY, Donna (1995): Ciencia, Cyborgs y Mujeres, Madrid, Ediciones Catedra.
Respecto a la posibilidad de establecer cruces y muradas sobre las formas en que las nociones tradicionales de genero y sexualidad han sido constestadas a partir del estudio y la experiencia de los sujetos que se situan en sus margenes, se recomienda la revision de los siguientes textos: Haraway, Donna.
Haraway, Donna (1991), "A Cyborg Manifesto: Science, Technology, and Socialist Feminism in the Late Twentieth Century", (1985), in Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention of Nature.
Haraway, Donna (1992) Simians, Cyborgs and Women, Routledge.
Haraway, Donna, 1988, Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism as a Site of Discourse on the Privilege of Partial Perspective , Feminist Studies 14, 3 : 575-599.