hard freeze


Also found in: Acronyms.

hard freeze

[′härd ¦frēz]
(hydrology)
A freeze in which seasonal vegetation is destroyed, the ground surface is frozen solid underfoot, and heavy ice is formed on small water surfaces such as puddles and water containers.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The removal of the hard freeze may not result in the payment of the refund, as the authorization to release the hard freeze is a separate process from the approval of the payment.
Our expectation is that, in general, the benefits of a hard freeze would be more pronounced for firms facing financial constraints.
If you live in a freeze zone, you'll have to blow out the system before the first hard freeze. It's easy to do with a home air compressor, but you'll have to install the components now (instead of during a snowstorm).
So things weren't too bad--until a hard freeze hit during the night.
It wasn't until a hard freeze in January knocked out water service for area residents and business for a week that the city decided to ask for funding that had been authorized three years ago.
A good, hard freeze overnight and the yard would be like a skating rink for us kids the next morning.
The roses revive again in September and remain "really pretty until the first hard freeze," Patricia says.
and after a hard freeze, they may need the food to survive.
those with 10,000 or more total participants) are significantly less likely than smaller sponsors to have implemented a hard freeze, with only 9 percent of plans under a hard freeze among larger sponsors compared with 25 percent of plans under a hard freeze among smaller sponsors.
The number of hard freeze days was determined for each spring "cold" period, a period that began and ended with a hard freeze day.
Another surprise is the degree to which American cotton growers can harness science to control their crops, for example, spraying them to turn the plants brown and crunchy without needing to wait for a short harvesting frenzy after nature provides its own hard freeze. Even more surprising, though, is that even with these technological tricks, the cost of American cotton is considerably above the world price--that cotton can generally be grown more cheaply in the poorest countries.
A hard freeze in 1898 drove Linton and some of these settlers away.