hard

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hard

1. Chem (of water) impairing the formation of a lather by soap
2. (of alcoholic drink) being a spirit rather than a wine, beer, etc.
3. (of a drug such as heroin, morphine, or cocaine) highly addictive
4. Physics (of radiation, such as gamma rays and X-rays) having high energy and the ability to penetrate solids
5. Physics (of a vacuum) almost complete
6. Chiefly US (of goods) durable
7. politically extreme
8. Brit a roadway across a foreshore

hard

[härd]
(materials)
Quality of a material that is compact, solid, and difficult to deform.
References in periodicals archive ?
Oddly enough getting hard money typically is one of the easiest loans to obtain.
as part of a comprehensive policy of inflation and cheap credit in order to benefit favored businesses." The Jeffersonian opponents of the central banking system, on the other hand, preferred "a hard money system based squarely on gold and silver, with banks shorn of all special privileges and hopefully confined to 100 percent specie banking." Jefferson would later go on to win the presidency and continue to speak out against the dangers of the BUS.
Under pressure for months to curb the soft money (contributions not regulated by federal election laws) spending of Section 527 political groups, the Federal Election Commission recently adopted a new rule requiring some groups to use federally regulated hard money to pay for at least 50 percent of their expenses, including salaries, rent, and other overhead.
For example, some prestigious research universities are now requiring new professors to accept positions with much less than 100 percent hard money, on the assumption that the professor can raise a sizable amount of his or her salary via grants.
First, McCain-Feingold doubled the contribution limits on legal "hard money" contributions, from $1,000 to $2,000.
With soft money zeroed out and hard-money limits raised, it wasn't too hard to foresee what McCain-Feingold would yield: Republicans raking in the hard money, and Democrats scrambling.
Bob Mosher, executive director of education at ElementK, an eLearning company that provides courses, service and support, believes there is an important distinction to be made between a "hard money" return on investment and the true success of any learning experience--the degree to which students can apply what they've learned when they're back on the job.
November will surely see an infusion of hard money and VAC money into both parties.
Under the new law, an individual will be able to give $2,000 in hard money per candidate per election--$4,000 total for the primary and the general--with a maximum of $37,500 to candidates per two-year election cycle.
Democrats and Republicans - Both parties raised roughly equal amounts of soft money in 2000, but Republicans have always bested Democrats in raising hard money contributions.
It would keep the $1,000 limit on "hard money" contributions to House candidates, but increase contributions to Senate and presidential candidates to $2,000.