Scleractinia

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Related to Hard coral: Soft coral

Scleractinia

[‚skler·ək′tin·ē·ə]
(invertebrate zoology)
An order of the subclass Zoantharia which comprises the true, or stony, corals; these are solitary or colonial anthozoans which attach to a firm substrate.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In 2003, the hard coral cover was below five per cent.
Sadly, one of the reefs that was beautiful with upwards of 70 per cent hard coral some four years ago has its remnant corals now being eaten by crown-of-thorns starfish.
Living corals are however distributed all along Balochistan coast, and at least 30 hard coral species and 8 soft coral species have been identified from various places along the coast, particularly Churna and the Astola Islands, where considerable living coral assemblages are found (Ali, 2008).
Fisher described the soft and hard coral they found seven miles southwest of the well as an underwater graveyard.
Well, 80 per cent of it comes from the erosion of hard coral.
Aqaba's coral reef hosts around 500 species of fish, 127 species of hard coral and 300 kinds of soft coral, in addition to thousands of plants and animals that co-exist in Jordan's sole gulf.
Hard corals are the "reef-building" corals, and there are approximately eight hundred known species of hard coral.
Kleemann (1992) illustrated that there is a relationship between bivalves' distribution and many types of hard coral substrata in the Northern Bay of Safaga (Red Sea), including reef flats, reef slopes, coral carpets, coral patches, and rock bottoms.
The Japanese had had years to dig in, and when the marines tried to do some digging of their own, their hand tools could not penetrate the island's hard coral.
In addition to some spectacular hard coral formations, the reefs in Biscayne have especially abundant soft corals.
Description of four new species in the hard coral genus Acropora Oken, 1815 (Scleractinia: Astrocoeniina: Acroporidae) from south-east Africa.
All the great whales, dolphins, six seal species, the queen conch, and all hard coral species, for which NMFS has jurisdiction, are listed on either Appendix I or II of CITES.