Hardener


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hardener

[′härd·ən·ər]
(metallurgy)
A master alloy added to a melt to control hardness.
(organic chemistry)
Compound reacted with a resin polymer to harden it, such as the amines or anhydrides that react with epoxides to cure or harden them into plastic materials. Also known as curing agent.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Hardener

 

in metallurgy, an auxiliary alloy used to introduce alloying elements into liquid metal for the purpose of imparting specific properties to the metal melt (for example, fluidity) or the solidified metal (increased mechanical strength). The assimilation of an alloying element from the hardener is greater and more stable than if the element were introduced in pure form. Hardeners are produced by fusion of their components or by reduction from ores, concentrates, or oxides. In ferrous metallurgy, hardeners are distinguished from ferroalloys, which are used for both alloying and deoxidation of metals. Metals that are added to precious metals (for example, gold or silver) to impart to them the necessary properties (for example, hardness) or to reduce the cost of manufactured articles are also called hardeners. Copper and mercury are used as hardeners.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

hardener

1. A chemical (including certain fluosilicates or sodium silicate) applied to concrete floors to reduce wear and dusting.
2. A material added to a paint or varnish vehicle to increase the gum or resin content, or to increase rate of oxidation, so as to cause an increase in hardness of the drying film.
3. The chemical component in a two-component coating or adhesive which causes the resin component to harden.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The lowest value of [T.sub.10] among all epoxy resin samples was obtained from the epoxy resin cured by 100% W93 without lignin, and this value increased 50[degrees]C with 20% the aminated lignin added in the hardener mixture (266-315[degrees]C), and the highest [T.sub.10] value was from the epoxy resin cured by 100% aminated lignin (332[degrees]C).
Understanding Hardener Selection for Good Anticorrosion Performance (SSR)
Different colors indicated the amount of finely dispersed particles into the hardener of coatings.
In the produced according to the corrected technology hardener, weight share of vanadium increased up to 12-13 %, and silicon reduced down to 5-7 %.
Solder mask A and F became more brittle as the hardener component of the mixture increased, but the opposite effect was observed on solder mask B, C, and D.
During curing the exothermic reaction may raise the temperature by about 80 [degrees]C, depending upon the amount of hardener used.
Once the hardener is dry, apply wood filler with a putty knife, scraping on a thin layer at first to cover the wood.
QYOU QYOU Q suggested a wood hardener to a reader recently.
The polyol (Desmophen A-160 SN) and its Polyisocyanate (Desmodure N75-BA) hardener used in this work were obtained from Bayer Company.
An easy way to deal with it is using Ronseal High Performance Wet Rot Wood Hardener, from pounds 6.48 for 250ml, which, as the name suggests, makes the wood rock hard, even if it''s rotten.
This usually requires you to mix hardener with the filler, which can be tricky, so read the instructions carefully.