harebell

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Related to Harebells: Campanula rotundifolia

harebell:

see bellflowerbellflower
or bluebell,
name commonly used as a comprehensive term for members of the Campanulaceae, a family of chiefly herbaceous annuals or perennials of wide distribution, characteristically found on dry slopes in temperate and subtropical areas.
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

harebell

a N temperate campanulaceous plant, Campanula rotundifolia, having slender stems and leaves, and bell-shaped pale blue flowers
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This giltwood stool bears his label and has a floral needlework top over a guilloche frieze, and curved cross frame carved with harebells. It sold for pounds 440 at Bonhams.
Within it, during the last month, nature has treated me to the sights of butter-coloured carpets of celandines, delicate wood anemones, harebells, wild garlic and bluebells.
The bastion of faith grows out of the ground as nothing has ever grown before, but its shingle skirts are now blackened by time and weather, and jewelled by dark alpine pinks, yellow trefoil and buttercups, festoons of white cow parsley, indigo harebells and the tiny blue stars of forget-me-not.
If you live in a chalkland area then grow chalkland plants like harebells and cowslips.
Previously knowing chiefly the anthologized poems, I looked for more of the same quality, but found mainly a predictable apparatus of harebells, violets, heather, larks, linnets, howling winds, winters, springs, and revenge.
Buy seed mixes that contain ox-eye daisies, yarrow, harebells, birdsfoot trefoil, cowslips, lady's bedstraw and others for drifts of colour.
Buy seed mixes that contain ox-eye daisies, yarrow, harebells, birdsfoot trefoil, cowslips, lady's bedstraw, betony, yellow rattle and others for waving drifts of colour.
The most popular choice were harebells, known as Scottish Bluebells, which would happily bring together the English and the Scots in peace.
Fields which were once full of buttercups, harebells, speedwells, ragged robin, cowslips and cuckoo flowers are now just grass monocultures.
Along the overgrown hedgerows harebells grew and in my vivid imagination these were the flowers that fairies used as hats and I was convinced if looked hard enough I would see one.
It describes UK flora and fauna in intricate detail, including the "rattle of harebells" and the "purple spikes of loosestrife" and was broadcast on Radio 4's Today show.