Harmodius and Aristogiton

Harmodius and Aristogiton

(härmō`dēəs, âr'ĭstōjī`tən), d. c.514 B.C., Athenian tyrannicides. Provoked by a personal quarrel, the two friends planned to assassinate HipparchusHipparchus
, c.555–514 B.C., Athenian political figure, son of Pisistratus. After the death of his father, he was closely associated with his brother Hippias, tyrant of Athens, in ruling the Athenian city-state.
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 and his brother, the tyrant HippiasHippias
, tyrant (527 B.C.–510 B.C.) of Athens, eldest son of Pisistratus. Hippias governed Athens after the death of his father. His younger brother Hipparchus was closely associated in office with him until Hipparchus was assassinated in 514 B.C.
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. The plans miscarried; Hipparchus was killed, but Hippias was not hurt. Harmodius was killed on the spot, and Aristogiton was executed. In spite of their mixed motives, they were soon made heroes of Athens and were given public recognition after the expulsion (510 B.C.) of Hippias. Two public statues, executed by AntenorAntenor
, fl. last half of 6th cent. B.C., Greek sculptor who executed the bronze statues of the tyrannicides Harmodius and Aristogiton. In 480 B.C., Xerxes carried these statues away from Athens, but they were discovered later at Susa by Alexander and sent back.
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, were erected, and coins were struck with their image.
References in periodicals archive ?
Do not then make a promise in anticipation but refuse it in realization"' (1397b30-4); and `As Iphicrates (argued), that the best person is the most noble, for there was no noble quality in Harmodius and Aristogiton until they did something noble, whilst he himself was more like them (than his opponent was): "At least my deeds are more like those of Harmodius and Aristogiton than yours are"' (1398a17-22).