Harmonists


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Harmonists

 

in ancient Greece, the followers of the musical theory of Aristoxenus.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Obviously, the example of the successful Harmony Society played a part, due to their German nationality, common religious backgrounds, the contact with Frederick Rapp in Philadelphia, and the correspondence of Baumler and other Separatists with the Harmonists. The mutually shared experiences of the common house in Rottenacker, the aborted land purchase in Brandenburg, the ocean voyage, the travel overland, and the eighteen months of working as one allowed the Separatists to see that they were stronger together than apart.
The Comedian Harmonists, five male singers and one pianist, were formed in 1928 in Berlin and quickly became an international sensation with their close-harmony arrangements of popular songs of the 1920s.
Rameau filled this theory with so many absurdities that one must certainly wonder how such extravagant notions can have found belief and even champions among us Germans, since we have always had the greatest harmonists among us, and their manner of treating harmony was certainly not to be explained according to Rameau's principles.
Baron himself in an essay on the Austrian/German film of 1997, The Harmonists, discusses the recent genre of "heritage films" in German cinema.
Coming together as a duo was very easy for the two harmonists. July 24th, marked the release of their first album under the RCA Nashville label, and is the second studio album of their career.
Das Songlexikon beleuchtet internationale Popsongs ab Beginn der Tonaufzeichnung in ihrem (popular-)kulturellen Kontext, von Veronika, der Lenz ist da der Comedian Harmonists bis zu Madonnas Hung Up.
Emblematic of the fortunes of utopian experiments in collectivism in real life (such as Icarians, Harmonists, Perfectionists, Owenites, Ruskinites), the country's most famous single literary attempt half-way through the nineteenth century to create an ideal community, to embrace blithesome co-existence, proved to be a pathetic failure: "I am weary of this place, and sick to death of playing at philanthropy and progress"--"Paradise, indeed!
Commenting on the image of crying in both poems, the Westminster Review's critic remarked that Hood's poem was "too monotonous in its wail" while Tait's Magazine's reviewer declared Barrett Browning's poem "far superior to ["Song of the Shirt"] that most powerful poem, in grandeur and profound significance, as Beethoven is to the best of other harmonists" (BC, 9:365, 375).
Davis critiques capitalism in an unexpected way in "The Harmonists." Concerning this story, the editors explain, "Having given readers a view of the worst life has to offer in the social injustices perpetrated on blacks and white women, Davis offers something more promising in 'The Harmonists'...: utopia" (xxxi).