Harold II


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Harold II

?1022--66, king of England (1066); son of Earl Godwin and successor of Edward the Confessor. His claim to the throne was disputed by William the Conqueror, who defeated him at the Battle of Hastings (1066)
References in periodicals archive ?
1066 Battle of Hastings William the Conqueror) v Harold II (King of Anglo Saxons)
King Harold II was mortally wounded on the battlefield and his body had to be formally identified by his mistress, Edith Swanneck.
| WHEN was King Harold II of England reputedly wounded in the eye by an arrow?
15 Who led the English army into the Battle of Hastings in 1066: Harold II or William II?
Much of the north of England rebelled against William's rule after he invaded England in 1066, defeating King Harold II and his army at the Battle of Hastings and declaring himself king.
Whether we are referring to Alfred burning cakes, the arrow in Harold II's eye, the red-hot poker in Edward II's rectum, or the murder of the princes in the Tower, there is a sense in which these stories have a cultural value over and above their historical importance: they are the stories from medieval history we all know, and to disprove any of them is to weaken the universality of our heritage.
| September 25 THE Battle of Stamford Bridge was fought just outside York today, in 1066, and King Harold II defeated the Vikings, led by King Hardrada.
was King Harold II of England reputedly wounded |in the eye by an arrow?
A group of historians has been refused permission to exhume a body from a tomb in the Holy Trinity Church in Bosham, West Sussex, believed to be the final resting place of Harold II. The team wanted to compare DNA from the headless, legless body in the coffin with that taken from descendants of the last Anglo-Saxon king.
HAROLD II (Reigned Jan 6 - Oct 14, 1066) William the Conqueror ordered Harold's body to be buried in secret after the Battle of Hastings to stop it becoming a shrine.
Richard III is the only English king to have died in battle since Harold II lost the Battle of Hastings.