Harpagon


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Related to Harpagon: Tartuffe, Moliere

Harpagon

his hoard of money means more to him than do his children. [Fr. Drama: Moliere The Miser]
References in periodicals archive ?
"Harpagon is determined that his daughter Elise will marry a wealthy old man who doesn't ask for a dowry - never mind that he's far too old, she can't stand him and that she's in love with the penniless Valere.
Harpagon has two children, a son Cleante and daughter Elise.
Amid the hysteria in this riotous production, Harpagon's servant, played by Lee Mack with drill sergeant timing in his West End debut, is a deadpan foil to his boss's obsessiveness.
Genitales: La forma y las dimensiones de los dos procesos esclerosados del harpagon son distintos.
As it happens, the refinedT quietly commanding Blasko is also Harpagon in this season's other Moliere offering.
The reviews were quite positive, mostly about the performance of Toomas Tondu in the role of Harpagon. However, the poet and critic Gustav Suits published an article in 1924, discussing Moliore's works and their Estonian reception in more general terms.
El misterio del Avaro, y entonces el conflicto de la obra, solo se dejara vislumbrar si no juzguemos a Harpagon, y tratemos de ver las cosas de su punto de vista.
For example, she discerns the plus-de-jouir operating in characters like Moliere's miser, Harpagon, whose mode of enjoyment is at odds with his ego.
Le second prendra tous les ridicules, toutes les infirmites, toutes les laideurs [...] c'est a lui que reviendront les passions, les vices, les crimes [...] c'est lui qui sera tour a tour Iago, Tartufe [sic], Basile; Polonius, Harpagon, Bartholo; Falstaff, Scapin, Figaro.
In "L'Avare or Harpagon's Masterclass in Comedy," Robert McBride turns his attention to the playwright's significant use of Plautus as a source.
Norman, "Moliere as Satirist"; Richard Parish, "How (and why) Not to Take Moliere Too Seriously"; Robert McBride, "L'Avare or Harpagon's Masterclass in Comedy"; Andrew Calder, "Laughter and Irony in Le Misanthrope"; Charles Mazouer, "Comedies-ballets"; John S.
For Riggs, each of the comic types ridiculed by Moliere is an archetype of a certain kind or version of modernity, whether it be Arnolphe's paranoia about women and chance, Don Juan's use of rationalism and mathematics to legitimize his own claim to autonomy, Alceste's desire for complete knowledge and control of the others, Harpagon's use of usury and encouragement of insatiable desire in his entourage, or the femmes savantes' will to impose an abstract and ideologically determined form of knowledge.