Hartmann von Aue


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Aue, Hartmann von:

see Hartmann von AueHartmann von Aue
, c.1170–c.1220, German poet whose name is also spelled von Ouwe. His chivalric romances Erec and Iwain are tales of Arthurian legend.
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Hartmann von Aue

(härt`män fən ou`ə), c.1170–c.1220, German poet whose name is also spelled von Ouwe. His chivalric romances Erec and Iwain are tales of Arthurian legend. Other works include the religious legend Gregorius; the idyl Der arme Heinrich [poor Henry], upon which Longfellow based his Golden Legend; and lyrics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jackson, The Works of Hartmann von Aue, Arthurian Studies 34 (Cambridge: D.
Jackson's book is the first in English to cover the whole production of Hartmann von Aue (fl.
As with so much medieval literature, nothing can be known for certain about the historical situation in which the narrative works of Hartmann von Aue were composed.
8 Brigitte Herlem-Prey, Le 'Gregorius' et la 'Vie de Saint Gregoire': Determination de la source de Hartmann von Aue a partir de l'etude comparative integrale des textes, Goppinger Arbeiten zur Germanistik 215 (Goppingen, 1979).
44 Hugo Kuhn, 'Hartmann von Aue als Dichter', in Hartmann von Aue, ed.
For example, although one would not dispute that Parzival scales greater heights than his fellows at Arthur's court, it is more debatable whether the polarization of the two Wertzentren - Round Table and Grail Castle - is not matched in Hartmann von Aue (p.
If one is willing to accept the interesting, but subjective, stance implicit in these three points, then there is a lot to be learned from this most learned, line-by-line commentary to the Erec and Iwein of Hartmann von Aue.
Okken's article in Amsterdamer Beitrage zur alteren Germanistik (1991) and his translation of Hartmann's complete narrative works: Hartmann von Aue erzahlt, insel taschenbuch 1417 (Frankfurt, 1992)).
Hartmann von Aue reveals himself to be an enthusiastic practitioner of this art of the reinterpretative interpolation (which draws heavily upon the techniques of rhetorical inventio and amplificatio) in his first Arthurian romance, Erec.