Hasidim

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Hasidim

or

Chassidim

(both: häsē`dĭm, khä–) [Heb.,=the pious], term used by the rabbis to describe those Jews who maintained the highest standard of religious observance and moral action. The term has been applied to movements at three distinct times. The first Hasidim, also called the Assideans or Hasideans, were an ancient Jewish sect that developed between 300 B.C. and 175 B.C. They were the most rigid adherents of Judaism in contradistinction to those Jews who were beginning to be affected by Hellenistic influences. The Hasidim led the resistance to the hellenizing campaign of Antiochus IV of Syria, and they figured largely in the early phases of the revolt of the MaccabeesMaccabees
or Machabees
, Jewish family of the 2d and 1st cent. B.C. that brought about a restoration of Jewish political and religious life. They are also called Hasmoneans or Asmoneans after their ancestor, Hashmon.
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. Their ritual strictness has caused some to see them as forerunners of the Pharisees. Throughout the Talmudic period numerous figures were referred to as Hasidim. During the 12th and 13th cent., however, there arose in Germany a specific group known as the Hasidei Ashkenaz. Influenced by Saadia ben Joseph and with messianic and mystical elements, it held as its central ideology the unity of God, the application of justice in all situations, social and economic equality, and martyrdom at the hands of the crusaders rather than compromise of any kind. The chief ethical work that derived from the group was the Sefer Hasidim (tr. Book of the Pious, 1973). The third movement to which the term Hasidim is applied is that founded in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov and known as HasidismHasidism
or Chassidism
[Heb.,=the pious], Jewish religious movement founded in Poland in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov. Its name derives from Hasidim. Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread
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.

Bibliography

See S. Lieberman, Hellenism in Jewish Palestine (1962); S. G. Kramer, God and Man in the Sefer Hasidim (1966); A. L. Lowenkopf, The Hasidim (1973). See also bibliography under HasidismHasidism
or Chassidism
[Heb.,=the pious], Jewish religious movement founded in Poland in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov. Its name derives from Hasidim. Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread
..... Click the link for more information.
.

References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, how "friendly" one Hasid is might not be an indication of guidelines set in the community.
In another context, the Talmud suggests, "The person who wants to become a hasid should abide by the laws concerning torts and damages, so said Rav Judah.
25) He was particularly upset in the way the Maggid separated himself from the ordinary hasid.
As he flees the chaos in Amersterdam, Sam meets another Hasid on the street.
Consider Dov Binyamin, the Jerusalem hasid of the title story, whose wife denies him sex, and whose rebbe grants him a "special dispensation" to visit a prostitute "for the relief of unbearable urges" (181-2).
Its hero, Reb Yudel Hasid, is the embodiment of every wandering, drifting Jew in the ghettos of the tsarist and Austro-Hungarian empires.
In a later sequence, Hasid bends tenderly over a bundle, lifts it, cradles it, and speaks to it.
There is no fear that the Jewish community is going to come to the streets and loot and rob and rape," Sliwa said, adding, a bit gratuitously, "When in my lifetime have I ever seen a Hasid grab anyone's pocketbook?
Pictured above l-r: Eran Polack, Sariel Engel, Hans Wagner, Monzer Khafagy, Amir Hasid, Nir Amsel, Samuel Wagner.
In their early lives it would have seemed unlikely that the paths of Primo Levi, an assimilated Sephardic Jew from Italy, and Elie Wiesel, an orthodox Hasid from Eastern Europe, might ever cross.
She said she plans to identify herself as Abbas Hasid Rumi Al Naely, a 44-year-old Shiite Iraqi turned over to American authorities by the Pakistani government in 2002.
Jason Biggs ("The Graduate") is to die for as a brash young Hasid named Hershel Klein, a New York diamond merchant who is fully observant of orthodox religious tradition but doesn't let it cramp his style, which runs to high-top sneakers and a Yankees yarmulke.