Hasidim


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Related to Hasidim: Chassid, Chasidim

Hasidim

or

Chassidim

(both: häsē`dĭm, khä–) [Heb.,=the pious], term used by the rabbis to describe those Jews who maintained the highest standard of religious observance and moral action. The term has been applied to movements at three distinct times. The first Hasidim, also called the Assideans or Hasideans, were an ancient Jewish sect that developed between 300 B.C. and 175 B.C. They were the most rigid adherents of Judaism in contradistinction to those Jews who were beginning to be affected by Hellenistic influences. The Hasidim led the resistance to the hellenizing campaign of Antiochus IV of Syria, and they figured largely in the early phases of the revolt of the MaccabeesMaccabees
or Machabees
, Jewish family of the 2d and 1st cent. B.C. that brought about a restoration of Jewish political and religious life. They are also called Hasmoneans or Asmoneans after their ancestor, Hashmon.
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. Their ritual strictness has caused some to see them as forerunners of the Pharisees. Throughout the Talmudic period numerous figures were referred to as Hasidim. During the 12th and 13th cent., however, there arose in Germany a specific group known as the Hasidei Ashkenaz. Influenced by Saadia ben Joseph and with messianic and mystical elements, it held as its central ideology the unity of God, the application of justice in all situations, social and economic equality, and martyrdom at the hands of the crusaders rather than compromise of any kind. The chief ethical work that derived from the group was the Sefer Hasidim (tr. Book of the Pious, 1973). The third movement to which the term Hasidim is applied is that founded in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov and known as HasidismHasidism
or Chassidism
[Heb.,=the pious], Jewish religious movement founded in Poland in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov. Its name derives from Hasidim. Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread
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.

Bibliography

See S. Lieberman, Hellenism in Jewish Palestine (1962); S. G. Kramer, God and Man in the Sefer Hasidim (1966); A. L. Lowenkopf, The Hasidim (1973). See also bibliography under HasidismHasidism
or Chassidism
[Heb.,=the pious], Jewish religious movement founded in Poland in the 18th cent. by Baal-Shem-Tov. Its name derives from Hasidim. Hasidism, which stressed the mercy of God and encouraged joyous religious expression through music and dance, spread
..... Click the link for more information.
.

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References in periodicals archive ?
Hasidim would hold repeated pilgrimages to their rebbe's court, and the rebbe would circuit-ride to the communities of the faithful.
No less complex are the continuous struggles of Hasidim in the pluralist secular democracy of the United States, where they negotiate their survival, compete for followers and struggle to prevent defections.
The openness and communicativeness of Habad Hasidim is evident in the identity of Ben-Moshe's informants, one of whom was a chance hitchhiker he picked up on the way back from a wedding, and who eventually would set up a farbrengen especially for Ben-Moshe's benefit.
In "Hassidim and the 'Reasonable Accommodation' Debate in Quebec," Shaffir analyzes the responses of Quebec's Hasidim to the reasonable accommodation publicity, much of which intimates that Hasidim make poor neighbors.
(22) Early zealots in the days of the Maccabees appropriated the term "asidaiot"--Greek for hasidim. They were the ones, apparently, who galvanized opposition to the Hellenizing Jews and the Syrian-Greek rulers and led the revolt culminating in the Maccabees' victory and Hanukkah.
Hynes, who has been heavily criticized for going easy on the ultra-Orthodox, and could set a precedent for more sex abuse charges among the Hasidim. The Times described the Samtar community of Williamsburg as "politically well-connected" and when Hynes was questioned about the lack of sex abuse cases, the Times paraphrased his response, noting "the lack of prosecutions on the intimidation to stay silent that ultra-Orthodox sex-abuse victims and their families often face from their own community leaders."
At the time, the Kabbalist hasidim were elitist and separatist.
Since this was not my first and only contact with a Hasidic Rebbe and Hasidim, I was not completely surprised at the happenings.
Gabriel, an archangel, mysteriously appears and explains to Daniel that this vision belongs to the end of time; that is, when the Hasidim will be victorious.
Here, the experience of the Hasidim community of Williamsburg is particularly instructive.
8 MODZITZER HASIDIM, "MIZMOR L'DAVID" This group of Hasidic composers was organized around the idea that songs could actually invoke the spirit of social change.