Haskins, Charles Homer

Haskins, Charles Homer,

1870–1937, American historian, an authority on medieval history, b. Meadville, Pa. At Harvard (1902–31) he was professor and dean of graduate studies (1908–24); in the latter capacity he greatly influenced contemporary graduate training. He served (1918–19) on the American commission at the Paris Peace Conference. Chairman (1920–26) of the American Council of Learned Societies and president (1922) of the American Historical Association, he was also founder and president (1926–27) of the Medieval Academy of America. His work in medieval history stimulated an entire school of American medievalists. Among his works are The Normans in European History (1915, repr. 1959 and 1966) and Norman Institutions (1918, repr. 1960); cultural and intellectual works include The Rise of Universities (1923), Studies in the History of Medieval Science (2d ed. 1927, repr. 1960), and The Renaissance of the Twelfth Century (1927, repr. 1957).
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Haskins, Charles Homer

(1870–1937) medievalist, historian; born in Meadville, Pa. One of the leading medievalists of his generation, he shed light on Norman contributions to medieval English government and on the impact of Greek and Arabic scientific materials on Western Europe. A noted teacher, as well as scholar, he taught longest at Harvard University (1902–28). During World War I he was a member of "the Inquiry," where he provided intelligence on Germany and later participated in the Paris Peace Conference (1918–19). A progressively severe case of paralysis agitans forced him to retire from teaching (1931).
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.