corpuscle

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corpuscle

1. any cell or similar minute body that is suspended in a fluid, esp any of the red blood corpuscles (see erythrocyte) or white blood corpuscles (see leucocyte).
2. Anatomy the encapsulated ending of a sensory nerve
3. Physics a discrete particle such as an electron, photon, ion, or atom
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

corpuscle

[′kȯr·pəs·əl]
(anatomy)
A small, rounded body.
(neuroscience)
An encapsulated sensory-nerve end organ.
(optics)
A particle of light in the corpuscular theory, corresponding to the photon in the quantum theory.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(12.) Liberti EA, Fagundes T P, Perito M A, Matson E, Konig Junior B: On the size of Hassall's corpuscles in human fetuses.
(16.) Gilhus N E, Matre R and Tonder O.: Hassall's Corpuscles in the thymus of foetuses, infants and children: immunological and histochemical aspects.
Medulla exhibited a number of Hassall's corpuscles which varied in size and shape.
Thymus in the age group of 11-20 exhibited normally lobulated thymus with Hassall's corpuscles in the medulla.
However, two of the specimens from 79 year old specimens showed normally lobulated thymus with reticulocytes and Hassall's corpuscles.
Similarly the diameter of Hassall's corpuscles was measured along its long axis through 100x objective in three randomly selected different fields.
Independent samples t-test was used to detect any significant difference between the experimental and control groups by comparing mean numbers of epithelioreticular cells and the size and number of Hassall's corpuscles in the medulla of thymus.
Although, no considerable difference was encountered between the experimental and control groups regarding the number of Hassall's corpuscles, their diameter was considerably larger in the group exposed to retinoic acid (p=0.004) (table).
Unlike other NIS-positive cases, Hassall's corpuscles stained with the cytokeratin antibody or NIS antibody were not detected in the thymic tissue (Figure 5(c) and (d)).
NIS, TSHR, and TPO were distinctively localized to Hassall's corpuscles. This result is in agreement with the study of Vermiglio et al.
The expression of TSHR was frequently detected in the Hassall's corpuscles and thymocytes of normal thymic tissues.