Hatshepsut


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Hatshepsut

(hätshĕp`so͝ot), d. 1458 B.C., ruler of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; eldest daughter of Thutmose IThutmose I
or Thothmes I
, d. 1495 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, third ruler of the XVIII dynasty; successor of Amenhotep I. He became king c.1525. In a great campaign he subjugated the valley of the Nile up to the Third Cataract (below the present Dongola).
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. She managed to rule Egypt by relegating her husband (and younger half-brother), Thutmose IIThutmose II
or Thothmes II
, reigned c.1495–1490 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, fourth ruler of the XVIII dynasty and the son and successor of Thutmose I. Unlike Hatshepsut, his half-sister whom he married, Thutmose II did not have a royal mother.
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, to the background during his brief reign. After his death, she continued in power as regent to his son, Thutmose IIIThutmose III
or Thothmes III
, d. 1436 B.C., king of ancient Egypt, of the XVIII dynasty; the successor of Thutmose II. After the death of Thutmose II, his wife Hatshepsut became regent for Thutmose III and relegated him to an inferior position for 22 years while she
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, and at some point was named pharoah. Thereafter she was regarded as a king rather than a queen and was often portrayed in pharaonic costume, including a false beard. Her reign (c.1479–1458) was peaceful, and she developed the resources of Egypt, encouraging trade and reviving the mining at Sinai. She also restored numerous monuments, initiated construction at Thebes, and built the famous mortuary temple at Deir el Bahari in W Thebes. After her death, however, all references to her on Egypt's monuments were obliterated, presumably by order of Thutmose III. In 2007 Egyptologists announced they believed they had identified her mummy.

Hatshepsut

 

Egyptian queen from 1525 to 1503 B.C.

Hatshepsut was co-ruler with her stepbrother and husband, Thutmose II (pharaoh from 1525 to circa 1523), and with her stepson, Thumose III (pharaoh from 1525 to 1473). She deprived her co-rulers of power and officially declared herself pharaoh (artists later depicted Hatshepsut with the pharaonic beard). She was supported chiefly by the priesthood of Amon. During her reign, Egypt’s holdings in Palestine and Syria were practically lost, a trading expedition to Punt was prepared, and the construction of temples was intensified. After Hatshepsut’s death, Thutmose III, wishing to eradicate her memory, ordered her images and all inscriptions of her name to be obliterated.

Hatshepsut

, Hatshepset
queen of Egypt of the l8th dynasty (?1512--1482 bc). She built a great mortuary temple at Deir el Bahri near Thebes
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, he sees changes instituted by Hatshepsut placing the temple of Amun-Re at Kamak "at the centre of Egyptian religion," as pivotal in weakening the kingship and ultimately ushering in the domination of the priests of Amun over the king.
The Temples of Hatshepsut, above, and Edfu, below, are just two of the fantastic sights on this six-day Nile cruise on the Royal Viking | The Temples of Hatshepsut, above, and Edfu, below, are just two of the fantastic sights on this six-day Nile cruise on the Royal Viking
As the example of Pharaoh Hatshepsut illustrates, labeling of a person as either "male" or "female" becomes problematic, as "we can create confusion if our labels create inadequate categories relative to the territory" (Kodish & Kodish, 2011, p.
In November 1997, gunmen from the group attacked tourists at Luxor's 3,400-year-old Hatshepsut Temple, killing 58.
Recent findings help to contextualize the work done during previous campaigns in the tombs of Djehuty, supervisor of the Treasure of Queen Hatshepsut (ca 1470 BC), and Hery, a courtier who lived about 50 years before the said royal scribe.
The coffin was found during ongoing excavations and documentation of the tomb of Djehuty, one of the highest ranking dignitaries during the era of Queen Hatshepsut, at Dira Abul-Naga area in western Luxor.
The balloon had been floating over the west bank of Luxor, one of Egypt's most renowned archaeological sites and home to the famous Valley of the Kings and the grand Temple of Hatshepsut.
The tourists'' bus was fired on as they visited the temple of Hatshepsut, one of the main attractions in the town of Luxor .
In the Metropolitan Museum near an Egyptian sculpture a strange ginger cat fixes its one eye on her and, before she can believe it, she is transported to the times and court of the female Pharaoh, Hatshepsut.
It was a description that likens the amount of power Lady K'abel had with that of well-known Egyptian rulers like Cleopatra and Hatshepsut as well as the biblical Queen of Shiba.
In order to rule Egypt, the female pharaoh Hatshepsut had to use the masculine title "king" and show herself as wearing male clothing.
After two years of analyzing a vial of Hatshepsut's lotion, housed at the Egyptian museum in Bonn, Germany, researchers reached two major conclusions: that Hatshepsut probably used it to treat eczema, an itchy skin condition; and that an ingredient in the lotion--benzopyrene, now known to cause cancer--may have killed the queen.