hawk

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hawk

hawk, name generally applied to the smaller members of the Accipitridae, a heterogeneous family of diurnal birds of prey, such as the eagle, the kite, and the Old World vulture. Hawks belong to the same order as the New World vulture, the osprey, and the secretary bird; they were formerly classified with the falcons but are not closely related genetically. Hawks have keen sight, sharply hooked bills, and powerful feet with curved talons. Strong and graceful in flight, they are distinguished from falcons by their broader, rounded wings.

Typical of the hunting hawks, or accipiters, is the goshawk found in northern temperate regions, which feeds on small mammals and on other birds, riding its prey to the ground. Other destructive American accipiters are the chicken, or Cooper's, hawk, Accipiter cooperi, and the small (robin-sized) sharp-shinned hawk, A. striatus, which is known to feed on at least 50 species of harmless or beneficial birds. The males of this group are usually smaller than the females. Buteos (called buzzards by the English) are a diverse and cosmopolitan group of medium to large hawks and eagles with shorter legs and tails and larger wings than the accipiters. They include beneficial hawks such as the American red-tailed, red-shouldered, broad-winged, rough-legged, and Swainson's hawks, which feed on harmful rodents and reptiles. Except for the harriers, or marsh hawks (owl-faced birds of open land and marshes), which are ground nesters, hawks build their nests of sticks and twigs in trees. All hawks regurgitate the indigestible portions of their prey as pellets. Included in the hawk family is the bateleur, a serpent eagle of Africa and Arabia which somersaults in its flight.

The name hawk is applied also to many falcons and the totally unrelated nighthawk (a goatsucker), certain members of the gull and jaeger families, and the hawk swallow, a European swift. True hawks are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Accipitriformes, family Accipitridae.

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What does it mean when you dream about a hawk?

To watch someone “like a hawk” is to suggest that suspicions are aroused and caution is advised. The hawk is also a high-flying regal messenger and symbolizes keen eyesight.

The Dream Encyclopedia, Second Edition © 2009 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

hawk

[hȯk]
(engineering)
A board with a handle underneath used by a workman to hold mortar.
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of the various smaller diurnal birds of prey in the family Accipitridae; some species are used for hunting hare and partridge in India and other parts of Asia.

Hawk

[hȯk]
(ordnance)
A U.S. Army surface-to-air guided missile that has a range of about 25 miles (40 kilometers), a maximum speed of about Mach 3, and a ceiling of about 45,000 feet (14,800 meters); originally guided by radio for attacking low-flying enemy aircraft, but newer models are radar-guided.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hawk

A flat piece of metal or wood used by plasterers to carry plaster or mortar; held by a wooden handle on the underside.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

hawk

1. any of various diurnal birds of prey of the family Accipitridae, such as the goshawk and Cooper's hawk, typically having short rounded wings and a long tail
2. US and Canadian any of various other falconiform birds, including the falcons but not the eagles or vultures
3. Politics a person who advocates or supports war or warlike policies
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005